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Kitchens: Howdens vs B&Q

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by chris1982, 13 Nov 2016.

  1. slippyr4

    slippyr4

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    Benchmarx is the same stuff as wickes, it's all travis perkins. Their ranges have different names but are identical. They're actually made by gower.

    I've just bough a kitchen by Trend (which is part of mereway). Not finished putting it in yet but it's good so far. Well made glued and dowelled, colour matched carcases and so on.
     
  2. chris1982

    chris1982

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    We ordered a kitchen from Howdens on Friday morning as they called us up on Thursday with a "Black Friday" special, and which we managed to haggle down even further. And they delivered it already Saturday morning (they insisted on that for the "special"). The units look very nice, but I haven't started fitting them yet at all, as I only started today taking out the old ones. Let's hope it turns out an easy job!
     
  3. motorbiking

    motorbiking

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    It isn't difficult as long as you take your time and check measurements accurately. I can't for the life of me see why people thing 2-3k to install a kitchen (excluding services) is a good deal. I did mine with the mrs in 2 weekends. That was flat pack.

    If you don't have any a set of cramps are worth the investment. Particularly if you have long runs of wall units. e.g.
    [​IMG]
     
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  4. chris1982

    chris1982

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    That looks great. I have G-clamps on my shopping list already, but have updated my time frame! I had only planned in one weekend, but no harm spending two, or even three, on it.
     
  5. HERTS P&D

    HERTS P&D

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    Very nice Motorbiking.

    Is that scooter yours? or do you have very tall children?

    Andy
     
  6. slippyr4

    slippyr4

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  7. chris1982

    chris1982

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    Ah, right, thanks! One more question. Do you bolt wall units to each other before hanging them up as one lot, or do you hang individual units and connect them afterwards?
     
  8. slippyr4

    slippyr4

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    hang then connect.

    draw your line for the hangers and get them all on straight and level. then hang one at a time, adjust, clamp, connect.

    start with wall corner unit if you have one.
     
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  9. wgt52

    wgt52

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    Maybe I like 'belt 'n' braces' but I affix a 'Bearer' to the wall first for the wall cabinets to sit on. Something like 1"/1.5"x2" timber.
    I then run more bearers of the same thickness done the wall to just below where the worktop finishes. Onto those bearers I fix spashback or similar. The space behind allows ease of cabling and pipe work. Electric socket outlets and where necessary cooker/oven/hob/dishwasher/washing machine power switches are then fixed through the new wall lining. OK so it means the floor cabinets sit a little further into the room but it does give more space behind them for the services to go - usually means that free standing machines are less likely to protrude from under the worktop.
     
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  10. JohnD

    JohnD

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    Use hanging rail. Level it once. It is stronger because you can use plenty of screws, skipping over any weak, filled or jointed spots. You can also reposition your cabs whenever the fancy takes you, or swap them around for different widths.

    The downside is you have to notch them, or put up with them standing off the wall 6mm. I paint mine to match the wall.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Available in 1m, 2m and sometimes 3m lengths
     
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  11. chris1982

    chris1982

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    Thanks. I might use a rail but would the cabinets then not always slide around? I have only a straight run, without corners.
     
  12. JohnD

    JohnD

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    no

    the hangers have a steel claw that hooks over the rail, and screws to adjust them up and down, in and out. If you want to move them, you have to empty the cabs to take the weight off, slacken the screws, then take the weight of the cabs and push them along.

    They don't slide around on their own.

    It is the same system as is used when you buy hangers in a packet, they come with a length of hanger that you screw to the wall, but it is only two inches long.
     
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  13. chris1982

    chris1982

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    I just took the old units down and saw the state of old hangers and broken out plaster around the screw holes. So I will use a cabinet hanging rail to spread the load. Thanks for the tip. Luckily the original level line is still visible!
     
  14. JohnD

    JohnD

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    the previous person might have had a blunt old drill, or gone too shallow. IMO an ordinary hammer drill can punch a neat round hole through most walls. Tap the plasplug so it is recessed below the surface of the plaster (you can do this by holding a screw against the centre of the plug. Unscrew it afterwards to release. Very hard bricks, or concrete, may need an SDS+ drill which is heavier and more powerful for masonry work.

    If you walls are very crumbly, drill the hole deeper, vacuum out all the dust, and half-fill it with no-more nails or similar (filling from the back) before inserting your plasplug below plaster level. The next day it will have set and will not turn or come loose in the hole when you drive in the screw. Verify that the hole is deep enough for your screw to go right in before injecting the adhesive. A 2-inch no.8 screw will be safe.
     
  15. chris1982

    chris1982

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    Thanks, and brown plugs or should I invest into Fisher nylon plugs?
     
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