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Kitchens: Howdens vs B&Q

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by chris1982, 13 Nov 2016.

  1. JohnD

    JohnD

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    I almost exclusively use brown plugs. Sometimes in soft brick for a big fixing I use the larger Fishers, with a bigger screw (the packets guide on screw size). I think the last time was when fixing a carport to the side of a house with coach screws.

    Some people will say that a brown plug and 35mm screw is excessive for a curtain rail, but I don't care. Mine never fall down.
     
  2. slippyr4

    slippyr4

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    I'd use the fischer plugs if the wall is remotely crumbly. They just work.

    If using cheapo plugs, drill half a mil undersized so the plug is a tight fit.
     
  3. motorbiking

    motorbiking

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  4. What most people don't realise with fitting cabinets, is that it's not the size of the screw or plug that matters. People assume that a larger plug and screw will secure anything to the wall, but in the case of kitchen cupboards, they're being held on by the downward force of their weight, so as long as the screw is strong enough to handle the "shear" strength of the cabinets weight, then you could even go down to a 50mm stainless steel no 6. Not that I've had the courage to try it yet, but it was an architect that taught me the principle.
     
  5. chris1982

    chris1982

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  6. slippyr4

    slippyr4

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    That's true, but a No.10 screw can handle a greater shear force than a No.6!!
     
  7. motorbiking

    motorbiking

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    And a long screw needs to wiggle out more before it falls out.
     
  8. crank39

    crank39

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    Not a kitchen fitter by any means but bought mine from magnet, fitted it myself and had no problems or anything missing, bonus was they're local just in case

    IMAG0024.jpg IMAG0022-1.jpg
     
  9. cjard

    cjard

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    I looked at benchmark/wickes. The equivalent from diy-kitchens.com was half the price (I.e. Half e price of their bullshit 50% off, plus an extra 10%) and had colour matched carcasses.. the saving meant granite worktops and a full suite of Siemens/Bosch appliances suddenly swallowed the budget but hey ho, no point being the richest man in the graveyard, right?
     
  10. cjard

    cjard

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    ps; I still think that kitchens are ludicrous money for some chipboard boxes.. way back when, I thought 45 grand to erect the entire timber frame for the house was expensive. Then the wickes sales rep quoted me 21k for a kitchen and was serious about it. Perspectives, eh?
     
  11. chris1982

    chris1982

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    Thanks for all the advice again. I am using a hanging rail, and are now scratching my head about cutting the worktop. I bought a cheapish (all relative) plunge saw and tried on the old worktop I took out. The first cut was fine, but ever since, there is massive kick-back and I don't manage to get a nice cut. I think the problem is that the saw is not having a soft start. Any tips how to avoid the kickback?
    To make matters more complicated, due to the layout of the kitchen I need to cut one end of the workout into a triangle (which will be the first thing you see when walking into the room)...
     
  12. slippyr4

    slippyr4

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    Is it laminate worktop? Do you have any joints to do?
     
  13. chris1982

    chris1982

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    It's a 3.6m laminate worktop without joints.
     
  14. slippyr4

    slippyr4

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    Your blade will be blunt then. They don't last 2 minutes. Neatest way if you haven't got a router is to cut oversized and finish off with a planer
     
  15. chris1982

    chris1982

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    Right. Thanks.
     
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