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LED bulbs that don't flash at 100 Hz.

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by ericmark, 29 Nov 2020.

  1. ericmark

    ericmark

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    I don't have a problem but daughter does, seems the lights in our house affect her, so SES or E14 bulbs which use pulse width modulated control not simple capacitor is required, but how can we find out which are which?
     
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  3. DetlefSchmitz

    DetlefSchmitz

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    Obviously only way is to buy one and try it.

    My son has similar problem. He discovered that the flickering ones had a space for a capacitor that the manufacturer had just left off to save money. He fitted the capacitor himself , but it raised the average power and the thing exploded the next day.
     
  4. 333rocky333

    333rocky333

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    look at the light via a phone camera, i was quite surprised what i saw
     
  5. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    Some car lights and illuminated bus signs have similar surprises when viewed via CCTV
     
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  6. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

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    I don't need CCTV, I can spot the flicker if the move across my vision.
     
  7. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    Too true,

    or the manufacture found that life in the real world was different from the world on the circuit designer's laboratory bench.

    For what it is worth there is some value in wiring a house to operate lighting on 12 Volt DC sourced from a trickle charged battery. Current control by a resistor for each LED element ( or series groups of up to three LED elements per group ).

    Not only stable non flickery light but vastly longer time before failure of a lamp and the lights remain available for a significant time into a power failure,
     
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  9. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

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    Volts drop might be an issue, with many lights in use at the same time.
     
  10. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    Multiple radials starred from the battery terminals.
     
  11. fluorescence

    fluorescence

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    If you don't mind going back to CFLs it might be worth looking for some good quality new old stock ones?
     
  12. SUNRAY

    SUNRAY

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    Good luck with that one...

    Even Bernards idea of using car bulbs is unlikely to be the solution and very wastefull powerwise.
     
  13. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    I mentioned car lights only because some car lights are pulsed to increase the illumination beyond the level that a constant current would produce.

    Using steady DC voltage to supply LEDs with a constant current ( resistive control, not switched mode control ) is the one assured way to have flicker free lighting with minimum production of ( wasteful ) heat.
     
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