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Looking for a simple solution to damp in solid floor.

Discussion in 'Building' started by RrogerD, 1 Jun 2014.

  1. RrogerD

    RrogerD

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    Hi,

    I am looking for a simple solution to resolve the damp present in my solid concrete floor. Any ideas?

    The floor was originally covered with Laminate but this has long since disintegrated, as has the surface of the concrete started to crack away. The skirting, battens and plasterboard in one corner was also rotten with damp, presumably rising up from the floor. I have stripped all of this back to the brickwork.

    I am aware of the various 'correct' methods of digging it all up and re-laying DPM etc but was really looking for a cheaper, less intrusive option. Can I for example, brush-on a paint-on DPM and then cover with self-levelling compound? Presumably, running it 6 inches or so up the wall also?

    Thank you as ever for any useful pointers.

    All the best,

    RrogerD
     
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  3. wakey77

    wakey77

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    its well worth a try mate wickes do a liquid dpm for around 15 quid for 5l if I remember correctly I've used it a few times with varied results just be generous with multiple coats
    not sure whether a self leveler would take to it though.
     
  4. RrogerD

    RrogerD

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    Thanks for your reply Wakey77,

    What do you think? Perhaps I could level it first and then paint on the DPM? Do you think that would work? It sounds as though you have had some experience of using the stuff.

    In your experience, did this resolve the damp issue?

    Just a thought, I guess that condensation could be a problem with the cold concrete......?

    I'd be interested to hear any further thoughts from anyone.

    Thanks so far.

    Cheers,

    Rroger_D
     
  5. Billem

    Billem

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    Hi, I have the same problem and have had varying degrees of "advice"!! We have a bungalow built in 1959 that had Marley tiles throughout which we removed for underfloor heating purposes. We have since discovered that the tiles had a purpose :oops:, and probably no dpm between the slab and subfloor, so after suffering mould growth I got a company in to do a thermal imaging report which uncovered the "moisture" problem in the floor. Was advised to latex screed. Today had a flooring guy round to quote on relaying the carpet as we are about to latex screed and was told this wouldn't solve the problem and that we needed to use a liquid dpm prime then screed. Although we have a layer of bitumen adhesive still on the floor which apparently needs to come up. I am at the end of my tether and don't know what to do for the best!! Am now wondering if I could simply lay a plastic membrane and screed over? Will this work? I don't relish the idea or mess associated with scarifying the bitumen off the floor. We have been doing the place up over the last three years so pretty soul destroying to be told we have this problem and that possibly all my newly laid wood flooring has to come up :eek: No-one seems to be able to give a concrete ('scuse the pun) remedy to this problem. I don't want to keep paying money out for things not to work. I think my problem is that I think everyone is out to get my money as this guy today was going to quote on ripping all my floors out and doing the scarifying, liquid dpm and screeding then relaying brand new wood, tiles and relaying all carpets.........costly job I imagine........just wonder if he had £ signs when he saw the footprint of the bungalow........CONFUSED and FED UP NOW!!!!! :confused:
     
  6. wakey77

    wakey77

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    If it were me id definatly self level 1st liquid membrane after and be very generous with the coats but take into acount when going over the top of it with what ever floor covering you choose it is a membrane and if you puncte it with a nail scratch it with a stanley blade etc it will let damp through so some sort of protection over the top of the liquid dpm would be a good idea.
    tbh i only see liquid dpm as curing the symptoms of the problem or at least the most obvious ones.
    good luck matey.
     
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  8. wakey77

    wakey77

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    liquid dpm versus 1200g polythene membrane = no contest polythene where ever possible is the way to go in my opinion mate.
     
  9. RrogerD

    RrogerD

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    I've been having a think about this.

    What I plan to do is to level the concrete floor as it is and then lay polythene sheet over it all and 6inches or so up the wall. I will then lay laminate underlay directly onto this and cover with laminate. May put a layer of 6mm ply over first. This should keep any moisture from rising and the underlay will form some sort of insulation to reduce condensation issues.

    Not quite sure about the wall join with the floor but I think, bring the plaster / plasterboard down to just above the plastic sheet or if plasterboard, then down onto the plastic (?) leaving an inch or so at the bottom and then finish with skirting.

    Does this seem about right? I am rather inexperienced with all of this.

    Thanks.

    RrogerD
     
  10. theprinceofdarkness

    theprinceofdarkness

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    have you investigated SRBF mixed with cement. Its extremely tough like leather and it bonds to cement unlike Viscreen (SP.?).
    The main problem is condensation!, cold floor unable to "soak" up moisture so beads of water sit on top to make it wet. Floors should really come up and be relaid properly with insulation under them.
    Frank
     
  11. RrogerD

    RrogerD

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    Hi princeofdarkness and others,

    The comments re 'beads of water' concerns me.

    Since my last post, I have made a start and have been battening the walls with treated 2 x 1 timber battens. I have left the battens short from the floor and have added a small sqaure of DPM sheet behind the lower fixings between batten and wall. Should stop moisture rotting the battens.

    Reading on another forum I notice a similar issue as mine in that the edges between floor and wall have a 2" gap. It is this which is particularly damp and full of damp material. I can obviously remove all of this stuff.

    My queries if anyone can please help, are:
    - what is the 2" gap for?
    - If I use bitumous paint etc do I just paint through this gap and up the wall?
    - if I use sheet, do I want to affix it between batten and wall or, between batten and plasterboard? The former should allow some air flow but traps the moisture in?

    Or should I continue as I am and leave painting the bitumen or adding the sheet? This way, the cavity between the battens could hopefully breath and help dry the wall?

    What are your thoughts anyone?

    Many thanks in advance,

    Rroger_D
     
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