Making LED candles warmer

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by JohnHarrison, 25 Nov 2014.

  1. JohnHarrison

    JohnHarrison

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    I replaced a number of old 40w filament candle bulbs with new LED candles under a wall light glass cover. The pack said they were "warm" as they were 3,000K. They are still rather too white for me. Is there anything I can wrap around the bulbs to make them warmer in colour temperature? They only consume 5W so they do not produce any heat.
     
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  3. Diyisfun

    Diyisfun

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    I sprayed low energy bulb's red to put behind a fire, to give a warm effect, it worked well for me, so you could try a pink paint with a mist coat. If you don't like it, its easy to remove.
     
  4. SimoninEaston

    SimoninEaston

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    While not wishing to gain a reputation for being picky, they don't not get hot 'cos they only consume 5 watts, they don't get hot 'cos they don't contain a filament that heats up and glows... BUT, the light energy created by modern bright LED lamps will heat up enclosing objects so don't be tempted to wrap them up with anything in an attempt to colour the light.
    Have a look on a light-specialist forum like candlepower - it can get a bit technical for me but I get the gist...
    http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?311740-LEDs-waste-75-as-heat
     
  5. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    Wrapping might not be good, but a light coat of paint will be fine. I saw some outside lantern-style lights at a restaurant once with a nice mellow light - they had painted CFLs inside.
     
  6. JohnHarrison

    JohnHarrison

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    Thanks. What sort of paint? Water based emulsion? The colour? a cream? Yellow?
     
  7. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    Wouldn't a lacquer be preferable as paint is opaque?
     
  8. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    You'll probably struggle to get reasonable coverage with any water based paint - it will tend to run off and end up extremely streaky. the ideal is 'glass paint' (available from such places as 'craft suppliers/shops') - which is what I've used for this purpose. Spray paint (which is available everywhere) might well work reasonably well.

    Kind Regards, John
     
  9. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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  11. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    All good, if we know the lamp has a glass envelope.

    Some (many? most?) LED candles are plastic - paints will stick differently, and there's a chance that a solvent based spray paint will eat into the plastic.

    JohnH - 3000K is classed as "warm white".

    [​IMG]

    Were they expensive? Could you risk experimenting? Should you first try an 2700K/827 lamp? Or get dimmable ones?
     
  12. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    I suppose that's a theoretical possibility, but most spray paints stick fine to most plastics, and the solvent evaporates so quickly that I seriously doubt that any significant 'eating away' would happen, even if it were a susceptible plastic.

    However, I suppose I can't knock 'assuming the worst'!

    Kind Regards, John
     
  13. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    I thought that, unlike incandescents (when the reason is obvious), very little colour change occurs when one dims LEDs - and, again in contrast to incandescents, even whatever change might occur would not necessarily be in the 'warmer' direction. Is that not the case?

    Kind Regards, John
     
  14. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    True, but I suspect a less intense light would be perceived as less harsh.
     
  15. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Possibly - so maybe a lower wattage one!

    Kind Regards, John
     
  16. JohnHarrison

    JohnHarrison

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    I have dimmable and they are 3,000K. Still too white. I got them because they fit into a bayonet fitting.
     
  17. big-all

    big-all

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    buy a tin off roses forĀ£5 and try the ccellophane wrappers :D
     
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