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Moving a soil stack/vent

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by mattdiyuk, 4 Aug 2021.

  1. mattdiyuk

    mattdiyuk

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    I have house built in 2011 with 2 internal soil stacks. There is one main soil pipe under the ground floor that runs front to back on the right hand side of the property, and a connecting soil pipe that runs under the kitchen floor diagonally from left to right. The vent for the system is on the right side soil stack, and this goes all the way to the roof.

    [​IMG]

    I would like to remove the ensuite and right-side soil stack, but this leaves me needing to vent the left side soil stack through the roof somehow.

    How would I cost effectively achieve this? The problem I'm having is that to vent the left side soil stack requires modification to the roof (I need to remove the old vent, tile that up, insert a hole for the new vent and make that good). Is this an expensive job?

    I'm also concerned that I might need planning permission to move the soil stack vent to a side profile of the building. The soil stack would be visible (albeit set back) from the street and I live in a conservation area. Will I need planning permission to add a street-visible soil stack vent?

    I was wondering if I could just run some pvc pipe through the loft space to the existing vent. It sounds horrible but it requires no modification to the roof structure.

    I presume running a vent out the side of the house is worse aesthetically than running through the roof and raises the same possible planning concerns.

    Any advice appreciated.
     
    Last edited: 4 Aug 2021
  2. CBW

    CBW

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    Yes you can join together ordinary piece of soil pipe to keep it connected, however you might be able to use an air admittance valve. Are there other properties on the run, and if so how many have soil and vent pipes?
     
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  4. mattdiyuk

    mattdiyuk

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    > Are there other properties on the run, and if so how many have soil and vent pipes?

    I'm not really sure to be honest. Currently there is a situation where if the bath hasn't been run for a while it can get a bit smelly in the bathroom, presumably because water in the U-bend evaporates or something. Not sure if that informs whether it's better to vent, but I don't mind connecting through the loft if there aren't any regulation concerns associated with doing that.
     
  5. polesapart

    polesapart

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    You can run the "dry" section of an SVP pretty much as you like, with no restrictions on length or number of bends.

    Just needs a couple of degrees slope on any horizontal sections.
     
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  7. Hugh Jaleak

    Hugh Jaleak

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    As above, run the vent from Left to Right through the roof space, only other proviso I can add is to ensure the pipework is adequately supported and clipped. I really wouldn't advice removing a vent and replacing with an Air Admittance Valve, could cause more issues than it solves.
     
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