1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

My neighbours wonky shed...

Discussion in 'Building Regulations and Planning Permission' started by nuzuki, 30 Jul 2018.

  1. nuzuki

    nuzuki

    Joined:
    15 May 2013
    Messages:
    303
    Thanks Received:
    2
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Ive recently bought a house and noticed my unneighbourly neighbour appears to have pushed the fence a little in order to get the roofing straight on his shed/outbuilding. Ive got to have a look at the deeds to see who owns the fence but lets just assume he does for now. I guess as its built of non combustable materials he can have the building right up to the boundary, is this correct?

    My concerns are a tile slipping out and hitting my son on the head or the fence collapsing due to weight of the building. Im not going to goto court over this or anything but just wondered what you guys thought about this situation?

    Thanks
     

    Attached Files:

  2. GeoffJ

    GeoffJ

    Joined:
    30 Jul 2014
    Messages:
    142
    Thanks Received:
    17
    Location:
    Croydon
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Another issue - the rain washing off the shed roof into your property - very annoying. Also, if you do own the fence then its useful life may be shortened.
     
  3. JohnD

    JohnD

    Joined:
    15 Nov 2005
    Messages:
    59,689
    Thanks Received:
    3,073
    Location:
    21st Century
    Country:
    Cook Islands
    consider putting up a gutter on your own posts. Obviously you would turn the outlet from the downpipe to gush into your neighbour's garden.

    A couple of concrere gravel boards will help prevent him pushing it back

    It looks to me like the fence has been erected on your land, so you might mention to him that you intended to demolish *your* fence.
     
  4. nuzuki

    nuzuki

    Joined:
    15 May 2013
    Messages:
    303
    Thanks Received:
    2
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Yep it does have a gravel trench underneath the fence so if its his fence its not so bad from a drainage perspective. I might put up a overhand down the side of the house and butt it upto his roof. You can see from the pics there is a wall plate on the wall from where a shelter used to be.
     
  5. nuzuki

    nuzuki

    Joined:
    15 May 2013
    Messages:
    303
    Thanks Received:
    2
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Yep im considering putting some posts into the ground so it cant be pushed further then using those posts to add a gutter like you say and an overhang made of fluted polycarb sheet. I just cant see how he thought this was an acceptable build unless he was playing a game with the previous owner. I'll get another photo possibly with plumb line to show how much the fence has been pushed over (its about 15cms at the top)
     
  6. nuzuki

    nuzuki

    Joined:
    15 May 2013
    Messages:
    303
    Thanks Received:
    2
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Ok I have just clarified that he owns the fence
     
  7. JohnD

    JohnD

    Joined:
    15 Nov 2005
    Messages:
    59,689
    Thanks Received:
    3,073
    Location:
    21st Century
    Country:
    Cook Islands
    If it's on his land

    But that part of fence which is on your land is yours.
     
  8. ^woody^

    ^woody^

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2006
    Messages:
    26,754
    Thanks Received:
    3,313
    Location:
    West Mids
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    That's random 'Final Destination' sh*t.

    Does that happen in real life?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. nuzuki

    nuzuki

    Joined:
    15 May 2013
    Messages:
    303
    Thanks Received:
    2
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Haha yep I know its unlikely. Im just trying to think of health and safety reasons to get the council on my side. If I say my neighbours nicked a bit of land by pushing my fence over they wont do sod all.

    I did find a third of a broken tile on my side of the fence but cant see the other part of the broken tile on the building. My house tiles are a different variety.
     
  10. ^woody^

    ^woody^

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2006
    Messages:
    26,754
    Thanks Received:
    3,313
    Location:
    West Mids
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    They won't do sod all anyway as it's a civil boundary dispute.
     
  11. footprints

    footprints

    Joined:
    21 Sep 2011
    Messages:
    3,794
    Thanks Received:
    716
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Pretty sure he should not shed water onto your property, but these things can get so out of hand you need to consider if it is worth the aggro.
     
  12. ^woody^

    ^woody^

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2006
    Messages:
    26,754
    Thanks Received:
    3,313
    Location:
    West Mids
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Shed water :rolleyes:
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. footprints

    footprints

    Joined:
    21 Sep 2011
    Messages:
    3,794
    Thanks Received:
    716
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Yup!:p
     
  14. lt8480

    lt8480

    Joined:
    2 Aug 2016
    Messages:
    209
    Thanks Received:
    37
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I'd basically ask them to straighten the fence up as its "falling over", which they would hopefully do. (rather than suggest they deliberately pushed it over).

    If they refuses ask them to take the fence down, or ask if you can take it down - assuming there is a wall or something the other side of it it doesn't really need to be there.

    If they still refuse then technically anything built on your land is yours. Whether he paid for it and erected it and then pushed it onto your land is immaterial to the ownership of the fence. It just means he committed tresspass if its now on your land. Of course assuming the post is the ground are still his side, determining the exact point the fences leans over your land may be difficult to determine where to cut - you may need a laser!
     
  15. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2019
    Country:
    United Kingdom

    If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

    Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


    Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

     
Loading...

Share This Page