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Neff single built-in ovens-13A plug or hard wired?

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by Ltnman, 4 Oct 2011.

  1. Ltnman

    Ltnman

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    I will be ordering soon a Neff series 2 B15M42 2.85KW Oven. I can't find a manual to download so was wondering how these ovens connect to the mains.
     
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  3. Taylortwocities

    Taylortwocities

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    Click on THIS LINK

    Scroll down to the bit that says

    "Requires Electrician To Hard Wire"

    click on "more info"

    And that nice Alison will tell you THIS!!
     
  4. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    I wonder if it's worth asking them for the technical reasons for saying that it must be hardwired "so that you get the optimum performance from your appliance"?

    It would also be interesting to have them explain why their animation shows that it should be connected to a 45A switch, not an FCU.
     
  5. securespark

    securespark

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    Never mind all that stuff, hasn't Alison got a full cleavage!! :eek:
     
  6. PrenticeBoyofDerry

    PrenticeBoyofDerry

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    If you scroll further down you will also see, she/he has some dangly bits! :eek: :LOL:
     
  7. Ltnman

    Ltnman

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    Finally downloaded a Neff install manual which states that a 13A plug can be used or an all-pin isolating switch with at least a 3 mm contact gap.

    Does Part P not allow me to connect a flex cable to 3 screw terminals on the oven?

    Connecting the appliance to the power supply -
    Fig. 4
    Only a licensed expert may connect the appliance. National
    regulations apply as well as those of your electricity supplier.
    Check the specifications on the rating plate concerning voltage
    and total power.
    The appliance corresponds to safety class I and may only be
    operated in conjunction with a safety earth terminal.
    Power cord: Type H05 V V-F or a higher rating. The yellowgreen
    wire for the safety earth terminal must be 10 mm longer on the
    appliance side than the other wires.
    In the installation, there must be an all-pin isolating switch with at
    least 3 mm contact gap, or the appliance must be connected
    using a plug with an earthing contact. This must remain
    accessible after installation.
    Contact protection must be ensured by the method of
    installation.
    Identify the phase and neutral (zero) conductors in the power
    socket. The appliance could be damaged if incorrectly
    connected.
     
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  9. Taylortwocities

    Taylortwocities

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    Neff need to cover their backs.

    Its safer for them to say "You've got to use a qualified electrician" rather than
    "installing our stuff is so easy anybody can do it".

    You can connect whatever you like to the oven. Its when you connect it to the wall that it gets interesting.

    But Part P allows you to connect a cooker in the privacy of your own home without telling anyone about it. ;)

    cookers, ovens and hobs rated over 2KW "should" be on its own circuit. This is to reduce points of high current in ring final circuits,.

    EDIT Do you have a dedicated cooker point?
     
  10. Ltnman

    Ltnman

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    Yes I do it’s on a 32A rcb. At the moment it feeds a free standing cooker. After the kitchen has been done up and the old cooker removed, I will connect a 7kw hob to the dedicated cooker wall outlet, as the hob is going where the cooker is.

    The oven is going on a connecting wall around 5m away. I have been debating whether to connect it to a 13amp plug or run a cooker cable behind the new kitchen units to the dedicated cooker outlet where the 7Kw hob will also be connected.

    The house has 3 ring mains on 3 32A rcb’s. The ring main the cooker could connect to serves half the kitchen only via 4 sockets (fridge, dishwasher, microwave with grill and cordless phone) The utility room (washing machine and freezer) and one unused socket in the 4th bedroom.

    So would it be better to connect the cooker via a 13a socket or run back to the dedicated cooker outlet or is it just down the personal taste?
    I am thinking that what I propose to do is exempt from part P.
     
  11. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    Nothing is exempt from Part P.
     
  12. Taylortwocities

    Taylortwocities

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    True, What the OP meant (as you well know) is that what he is doing is not notifiable.

    Extending the cooker circuit and running it 5 metres round the room would be notifiable.

    Plugging the new oven into an existing socket would not be notifiable.

    Phew, I'm glad we cleared that one up. ;)
     
  13. Ltnman

    Ltnman

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    Just another thought. If I fit a 13A plug then the oven will be protected by a 13A fuse. If it is connected to the cooker outlet then the protection is the 32A breaker. Is the 13A fuse not a safer option?
     
  14. Taylortwocities

    Taylortwocities

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    It depends on what the manufacturer says.

    So a 13A fused plug would seem to be the manufacturer's requirement.

    FYI
    The 32amp breaker is there to protect the CABLE that runs from the consumer unit to the cooker isolation switch and not the appliance that is connected to it. This cable is selected to be capable of carrying 32amps.
     
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