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New Induction hob, existing cooker circuit

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by btb23, 22 Jan 2016.

  1. btb23

    btb23

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    I'll be getting an electrician to install a new induction hob and would like to be aware in advance what new or altered wiring will be required.

    The house was built in 1997 and has a split consumer unit. The existing cooker circuit is in 6mm cable on a 32A mcb, not RCD protected. There is a isolating switch in the kitchen marked 'Cooker'. It is original house wiring and would expect it was to the standard required at the time built.

    The existing oven is 4.9kW, the new hob 7.1kW.

    Is the existing 6mm cable and 32A mcb adequate?

    I believe new regs require cooker and hob to be RCD protected, so I expect the electrician will move the existing 32A cooker mcb over from the unprotected to the RCD side of the consumer unit, fit a junction box behind the kitchen units to split this and supply both oven and hob off this circuit. Finally test and be given a certificate to say the works complies with regs?

    Does that more or less sum up what I should be quoted for?
     
    Last edited: 22 Jan 2016
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  3. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    Yes.

    No, new concealed unprotected cables and sockets do.

    You don't have to.

    Is there not one there already?
    There are double Cooker Connection Units.

    Yes.

    Yes.
     
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  4. btb23

    btb23

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    Thank you.

    Seems fairly straightforward then. I had a look behind the existing (double) oven and its connected direct from the 45A cooker switch nearby. There isn't a double appliance splitter as the existing hob is gas and not on the same oven circuit.

    So no need to be RCD protected as its an existing circuit. It would be simple to protect, there's a spare RCD slot on the CU. I'll chat with the electrician and see what view he has about whether to do that or not.

    Thanks again, advice appreciated.
     
  5. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    From the point of view of the appliances, there would be no requirement for RCD protection even if it were a new circuit. However, as you've been told, if a new circuit included any wiring buried in walls, then that probably would require RCD protection.
    If that's the case, then I would personally be inclined to have it swapped (unless there was some other circuit which had a more pressing call on the spare RCD-protected slot). Although there is no requirement for cooking appliances, per se, to be RCD protected, it has some theoretical advantages (although some potential 'downsides' as well!).

    Kind Regards, John
     
  6. btb23

    btb23

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    Thank you.

    The only new cable would be less than 2 metres length of 6mm clipped to the wall behind the kitchen units, accessible where needed to do this when the drawers are removed. I'd like having the oven/hob on an RCD circuit, all sockets and central heating already protected, just cooker, alarm system and lights are unprotected.

    Thanks again
     
  7. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    If it's on the surface, there would be no requirement for RCD protection.
    As I've said, I would probably think/do the same.

    Kind Regards, John
     
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