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New workshop tools - new or used?

Discussion in 'Tools and Materials' started by pilsbury, 1 Jun 2020.

  1. pilsbury

    pilsbury

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    Always fancied a proper workshop. It’s now coming closer to reality, hopefully in the coming months. I intend to mainly woodwork and have been eyeing up “big boy” toys to purchase. I’m sick of muddling through outside with crap tools, chop saws that don’t cut square let alone any where near a 45^ mitre.

    Table saw and a planer thicknesser are on the cards. I have the choice of going the new route eg Dewalt dw745 table saw at just over £500 and the Dewalt thicknesser dw733 at around £600. Those or Makita variants seem fairly well respected for the price.

    I have also been looking on fleabay and note some old industrial beasts that can be had for similar money..... clearly a step up build quality with cast iron tables, solid fences etc but have spent the last quarter of a century working in industry.

    What would you do? Portability isn’t really a factor. Even the job site dewalt table saw will be mounted recessed on an outfeed table and as good as static. I’m simply after machines that do what I want them to do time after time. Cut true and square. Not too much to ask as I then only have to worry about my inability and not the tool!
     
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  3. EddieM

    EddieM

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    Too many variables in there, how bigs the workshop, what power supply have you got, what more specifically are you thinking of doing? woodwork is too vague.

    1 point though to bear in mind, many industrial tools are 3 phase. There probably are bargains to be had on fleabay, but I've generally given up on them for pricier stuff.
     
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  4. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    Have you ever used industrial machinery? Do you know how to set it up safely? How good a mechanic are you? Basically if you buy old industrial stuff, quite apart from the three phase issue, you'll need to be able to do your own maintenance work (and if it's British you'll also need BSW and BSF spanners, etc for stuff pre-1980s), the spares (when you can find them) tend to be priced like Jaguar spares rather than Ford Ka spares and forget about manuals because if it is over 10 years old you'll struggle. Also do you know enough about this type of kit to be able to recognise a lemon or a nail? The cheaper they are the more likely they are to be useless, worn out, broken or beyond economic repair even by startup joinery firms who have a clue. So ask yourself the same sort of questions you would ask if you were looking at a 45 year old Jaguar

    In case you think its sour grapes, I started two trade workshops at different times with a ragbag of whatever I could scrape together. So I've been there - and I wouldn't do it that way ever again, despite a good knowledge of the available kit and its' plus and minus points
     
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  5. EddieM

    EddieM

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    :LOL: I have a 15 year old Jag and I wouldn't buy it.
     
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  6. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    Try a 60 year old Wadkin.......
     
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  7. Ryler

    Ryler

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    I started with brand new crappy machines. Sip table saw, electra beckum bandsaw. Sold those.
    Still have the electra beckum spindle moulder though.
    Then came across second hand felder/hammer machines.
    Even second hand, and being the cheaper "hammer" version, it is exceptional quality.
    I do have some reasonable space though.
     
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  8. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    Luck? I've seen crappy, worn out knackered Felders being offered at ridiculous prices as well over the last 30 years. The only way to avoid that is to buy from Felder themselves -and that ain't cheap
     
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  9. HERTS P&D

    HERTS P&D

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    Go on, make us jealous, how big is your workshop?

    Andy
     
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  11. pilsbury

    pilsbury

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    Hmmmm..... you’ve pretty much given me the advice I needed! I’m fully aware of the 3 phase offerings and would obviously avoid. Shop size will be a mere 17sqm. Wood work is a general term but is as good as I can give due to the range of stuff I’d be after making. I’m not specialising. Jack of all trades, master of none!

    But, you have swayed me towards the reasonable quality commercial job site offerings. Thanks for your thoughts.
     
  12. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    At 170 square feet you are going to be organised to make it work, but it can be done
     
  13. Ryler

    Ryler

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    Its tiny really.
    900 sq feet.
    Work workshop is 5000 sq feet.
     
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  14. HERTS P&D

    HERTS P&D

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    Wow, I could like in that.

    Well done!

    Andy
     
  15. Lower

    Lower

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    Can’t comment specifically on woodworking machines, but second hand industrial machines are a minefield. It’s like buying a used car. You have know what you’re looking at and be prepared to take a risk.
     
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  16. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Get all your stuff cheap at aldi, and get up and running instead of pondering.

    No good dreaming over tools that you may not even be able to use properly.

    Why does any DIYer need a planner thicknesser for instance? Yes I know what it does.
     
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  17. johnny2007

    johnny2007

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    I agree with woody, but I would avoid aldi tools and buy lidl just from experience.
    All tools I bought from lidl for one time use or emergency are still going strong, differently from aldi's which were indeed a one time use.
    Once you're set up and done a few project you will know what you use most, what needs upgrading and what can stay cheap.
    I was given a Parkside mitre sliding saw by a customer over 15 years ago and for what I do it's perfect.
    Install good blades and you'll be pleasantly surprised.
     
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