obsolete parts?

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Hi All

Just a question I am sure somebody can answer, I have a Thorn apollo 15/30b which thankfully can still get most parts for but looking at the manual regarding spare parts as an example the 0 ring on the burner manifold ( dowty 204-112-4470 ) 402S098
is classed as obsolete.

I am not having any issues with the boiler at all and get a Gas Safety check every year, but if the O ring needs replacing at some stage, are these O rings available anywhere?

If not, seems extreme to have to change the boiler.

Any advice would be truly appreciated.
 
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Nope, obsolete is obsolete I'm afraid. Manufacturers can't be expected to continue producing parts for ancient boilers forever more, and in the case of Thorn they don't even exist as a manufacturer any more. They became Myson, who in turn also stopped manufacturing boilers when they were absorbed into Baxi group. Your boiler was only 65% efficient when it was new, so it's arguably due for retirement...
 
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To keep old boilers running is a problem, some are worth keeping going Taking work Home.jpg but the cost is massive when parts have to be made, and the workshop which has all modern machines to maintain these old ladies never existed when it was a commercial railway.

You can get '0' ring kits, but they were rather fiddly to use and expensive, I would try all I could to find a standard '0' ring first, but a box of assorted '0' rings is not cheap, and you don't know they will fit, we have needed to machine parts to take '0' ring available rather than find a '0' ring to fit existing, so repairs on the old girls becomes very expensive.

Unless you live in a house in St Fagans then time for new boiler, just had to do same myself, very small water leak after 38 year of service with only one transformer fitted in all that time, some how I can't see new one lasting 38 years.

What is my concern is how the old pipe work, radiators, and valves will take the increased pressure moving from header tank to sealed system? however likely the lock shield valves will need changing but rest should be OK.
 
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Safe enough to try odd O rings on water joints but gas connections would be a no no even for a Gas safe engineer.
As already said it has done well to last this long, they were a pretty basic boiler that often suffered pilot outage and noise issues, seems you got a good one.(y)
Time to retire the old girl while you have time to shop around, rather than trying in a panic to get any old installer to fit a boiler over Christmas because it failed without warning;)
 
D

dontbelieveawordofit

ours is a myson housewarmer , it’s an ugly bugger but super reliable.
it’s been in well over 25 years and no part of the boiler /fire has failed.
there doesn’t seem to be many spares available though.
had it serviced monday - first time in over 15 years:eek:.
he said if you told me this was serviced last year i’d have believed you.
be happy to get a winter or two out of it again.
 
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What is my concern is how the old pipe work, radiators, and valves will take the increased pressure moving from header tank to sealed system?
Depending on size of system ..... always best practice, when the old boilers removed, to seal it up and pressure test to 3 bar at least overnight and ideally over 24hrs.
 
D

durhamplumber

Depending on size of system ..... always best practice, when the old boilers removed, to seal it up and pressure test to 3 bar at least overnight and ideally over 24hrs.
Wow...Proper belt and braces caper...Even in a house ????..Take boiler out 1 day,cap off and come back another? Really?Why not a week? Just to be sure!
 
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Wow...Proper belt and braces caper...Even in a house ????..Take boiler out 1 day,cap off and come back another? Really?Why not a week? Just to be sure!

It's not quite clear what your reply is saying? Are you saying it shouldn't be pressure tested?

If I am changing a boiler over from open vent to pressurised, I will always seal and test the wet system for at least 24hrs and the customer is always aware of that and I haven't had a complaint about it up till now. Even then the install is caveated that long term there could be issues from older components leaking.
 
D

durhamplumber

It's not quite clear what your reply is saying? Are you saying it shouldn't be pressure tested?

If I am changing a boiler over from open vent to pressurised, I will always seal and test the wet system for at least 24hrs and the customer is always aware of that and I haven't had a complaint about it up till now. Even then the install is caveated that long term there could be issues from older components leaking.
Just curious as to your methodology...
So...Back boiler out/combi in.
Two men.arrive Monday morning.B/B out.carpets,floor boards up etc...Tanks taken out...Cap off by lunchtime,pressure test,re-fit carpets etc..tidy up..Pressure test until Tuesday lunchtime....Arrive back,carpets,boards up etc..alter pipework if sound .Fit Combi...Add cleaner,leave another 24hours to circulate..Come back wed lunchtime,fit controlsetc....Either long shifts or you back on Thurs again??? About right??
 
D

durhamplumber

Even then the install is caveated that long term there could be issues from older components leaking.
Sounds total waste of a day to me.Long term it is all going to fail eventually.
 
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Been a while since I've had to take out a back boiler and the last one was a full rip out and replace everything, that being said each install runs on it's own merits and different decisions are made job dependent.

Cleaner will go in a week before work starts. I will always recommend that a pressure test will be performed prior to install, even then the install is caveated, it's always stated as part of the estimate. I will drain the system, flush, sealed and pressurise day 1, before the old boiler is decomm'd. Doesn't take long to cap feed, vent, flow and return and isolate rads and then pump the system up to 3 bar.

Then the old boiler is decomm'd, tanks removed and set out for new install. Day 2 will see how well the system is holding and decisions made at that point if not.

Don't agree that every system is going to fail eventually, had a fair few systems converted to sealed and to date I've only had 3 lose pressure and only one of them was after the fact (touch wood).

Carpets and boards, if lifted, aren't screwed back down whilst working, so take minutes to relift, all made good at the end, with a fair wind then usually buttoning up by the end of day 3.
 
D

durhamplumber

Been a while since I've had to take out a back boiler and the last one was a full rip out and replace everything, that being said each install runs on it's own merits and different decisions are made job dependent.

Cleaner will go in a week before work starts. I will always recommend that a pressure test will be performed prior to install, even then the install is caveated, it's always stated as part of the estimate. I will drain the system, flush, sealed and pressurise day 1, before the old boiler is decomm'd. Doesn't take long to cap feed, vent, flow and return and isolate rads and then pump the system up to 3 bar.

Then the old boiler is decomm'd, tanks removed and set out for new install. Day 2 will see how well the system is holding and decisions made at that point if not.

Don't agree that every system is going to fail eventually, had a fair few systems converted to sealed and to date I've only had 3 lose pressure and only one of them was after the fact (touch wood).

Carpets and boards, if lifted, aren't screwed back down whilst working, so take minutes to relift, all made good at the end, with a fair wind then usually buttoning up by the end of day 3.
Good grief.Never heard such a long winded caper to fit a Combi.
 
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