1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

Old Angled Lockshield Valve? How to close?

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by chris1982, 5 Nov 2017.

  1. chris1982

    chris1982

    Joined:
    16 Nov 2013
    Messages:
    476
    Thanks Received:
    43
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hi, I want to fully turn off an old towel radiator (so that I can replace the bleed valve), so I want to close the TRV (easy) and an odd looking lockshield valve (not sure how).
    The valve is a type I haven't seen before, and I am not even sure it's a valve or a drain point. It's angled (see photo 1), has a white plastic bit (cover I suppose) that is held in place by a Philips screw (see photo 2).
    How do I close it?
    Thanks a lot in advance!
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Sponsored Links
  3. copea

    copea

    Joined:
    30 Nov 2013
    Messages:
    226
    Thanks Received:
    36
    Location:
    Essex
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Unscrew the screw, pull the plastic cover off, get an adjustable wrench and turn the spindle in clockwise until it stops turning.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  4. AGAS

    AGAS

    Joined:
    21 Feb 2014
    Messages:
    9,695
    Thanks Received:
    1,718
    Location:
    down south
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    like any other lock shield
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  5. chris1982

    chris1982

    Joined:
    16 Nov 2013
    Messages:
    476
    Thanks Received:
    43
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Great. Thanks, so that screw is just holding the cover then?
     
  6. denso13

    denso13

    Joined:
    22 Jan 2007
    Messages:
    5,637
    Thanks Received:
    1,117
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Yes
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  7. chris1982

    chris1982

    Joined:
    16 Nov 2013
    Messages:
    476
    Thanks Received:
    43
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks!
     
  8. oldbuffer

    oldbuffer

    Joined:
    6 May 2010
    Messages:
    1,435
    Thanks Received:
    535
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Count the number of eighths of a turn to close, so that you can open up to the same point when you have finished. This way, the system stays in balance, or at least as balanced as it was, before the work.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Sponsored Links
  10. D_Hailsham

    D_Hailsham

    Joined:
    18 Oct 2007
    Messages:
    10,587
    Thanks Received:
    1,343
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Twelfths are normally easier as the spindle is normally surrounded by a hexagonal nut.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  11. chris1982

    chris1982

    Joined:
    16 Nov 2013
    Messages:
    476
    Thanks Received:
    43
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I will count. I am aware of the balancing issue.
     
  12. Aquaheat

    Aquaheat

    Joined:
    19 Nov 2007
    Messages:
    3,088
    Thanks Received:
    591
    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I prefer 36ths as it provides higher accuracy. I've found that 72ths is over kill and achieves very little more.

    OP just keep an eye on how many turns/half or quarter turns it is to close and you'll be reet. Pi55ing about with 12ths of a turn will get you nowhere fast. If the system is that critically balanced you have greater issues.

    Jon
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  13. chris1982

    chris1982

    Joined:
    16 Nov 2013
    Messages:
    476
    Thanks Received:
    43
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    All done and good I think. Thanks again.

    (I counted 13 "turns" from spanner at the bottom of the towel rail to the floor, plus one additional eight turn)
     
  14. dilalio

    dilalio

    Joined:
    20 Mar 2009
    Messages:
    7,927
    Thanks Received:
    1,289
    Location:
    Potters Bar
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Has to be 1/4 turns cos that’s how far you can usually go before wrench hits the rad :)

    Edit: Or floor !!!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. gasbanni

    gasbanni

    Joined:
    7 Jan 2007
    Messages:
    8,744
    Thanks Received:
    1,025
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    You bloody clever dick !!!
     
  16. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2019
    Country:
    United Kingdom

    If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

    Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


    Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

     
Loading...

Share This Page