Options for treating a sanded wooden floor

Discussion in 'Decorating and Painting' started by d000hg, 18 Jan 2018.

  1. d000hg

    d000hg

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    Having our Victorian boards sanded after removing the carpets... nice 22mm ones.

    What options are there for treating them and what are the pros and cons? I'm aware that it's a right faff to do one option and change your mind.

    So far varnish seems the obvious one, but it can be slippy and shiny and I guess if it scratches or chips it will flake off as it's a surface treatment only? What we'd probably like is them to be coloured (pine or other light colour but not Scandinavian) but then look as if they are untreated while obviously this isn't the case. So they look and feel 'warm', if that's a useful term.

    I suppose waxing and staining are other choices but that's where I run out of ideas.
     
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  3. If you start staining them, then it'll make any repairs more difficult. You'll want a UV stabilised varnish, or you can use something like OSMO solid oil that can be done in a couple of coats. Have a look on OSMOs website for your options.
     
  4. d000hg

    d000hg

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    So here's a hiccup. Some parts of the floor are painted with a weird black paint which appears to melt the moment it's sanded, clogging the sanding paper... They've got through 10 sheets of 40 grit just to do one part.

    Anyone know what this might be and how to get it off? The boards appear original Victorian. They're going to try heat next but haven't come across whatever this is before.
     
  5. Go for the heat and scraper, get the floor cleaned, and then come back with the results.
     
  6. d000hg

    d000hg

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    Seems to be working, though white spirit is the best they've found... Makes the black stuff go brittle so it can be sanded.


    So, I have antique boards which I presume are pine (?). They've used new 20mm boards for repairs which are very pale...I love the way the old boards are coming up but wonder what I would treat the new ones with to get a match, before perhaps applying a clear varnish on top?

    IMG_20180118_140704.jpg IMG_20180118_183242.jpg
     
  7. d000hg

    d000hg

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    My issue is I want the same finish on new and old boards... Stains all seem to be stain+varnish, would I be better colouring the new wood then applying the same varnish to the whole floor? Colouring the new boards with something that permeates without affecting the finish. Would that be oiling or waxing... Or should I just get some clear and coloured varnish from the same range?
     
  8. You're not going to get the same finish I'm afraid. You've got old and new boards, and unless you get a very dark stain then you're going to get a difference in the colour. You would have been better off staggering the new boards around the room, and that would have blended them in a bit.

    Have you looked on the Osmouk.com website for the range of finishes and colours they do.
     
  9. d000hg

    d000hg

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    Identical is not the dream, just similar. The photo above shows then after sanding... The old boards are quite pale just not white like the new ones. I see people sell antique pine varnish/stain.

    But finish and colour are separate things. Different colours on the new boards is one thing, but the old ones being Matt and the new ones gloss for instance would be awful!

    We couldn't get old boards up without damaging them... And sadly there were no reclaimed ones to be had when we needed them
     
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  11. Getting the old boards up require patience, you use a nail punch to knock the nails through. Whichever way you go, whether colour, stain, matt or oil/wax finish, you're going to notice the new boards for a few years till the blend in.
     
  12. d000hg

    d000hg

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    Yeah that's fine... Part of the character as long as they're at least sort of close. I can always sand it if I mess it up I suppose
     
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  13. lostinthelight

    lostinthelight

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    Once exposed to natural light boards can darken quite a bit over time without stain.
    litl
     
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  14. Bosswhite

    Bosswhite

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    Talking to an old boy in the carpet trade, he said the current trend of sanding floorboards and staining only lasts a short time, most people end up re carpeting the floors, they find floorboards just look cold, noisy/slippery and collects dust.
    such are modern day trends.
     
  15. d000hg

    d000hg

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    Trends are short-lived but we're removing carpet in the bedroom for reasons other than aesthetic.

    In a living area it's quite traditional... I can imagine people stripping all their bedrooms disliking the noise though.
     
  16. lostinthelight

    lostinthelight

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    Aren't boards better for allergy sufferers, carpets collect the same amount of dust as wooden floors but just store it out of sight until some but not all of it can be sucked up when theres time?
    litl
     
  17. It's a bit of shock as to how much dust collects in a room when you've got floorboards - and unless you have OCD and clean every day, then it gets stressful. At least with carpets, you can ignore the dust because you can't see it.
     
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