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Painting exterior trim - wood, metal, plastic - Little Greene advice

Discussion in 'Decorating and Painting' started by seneca, 24 Jun 2018.

  1. seneca

    seneca

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    Hello,
    I'm about to paint all of the exterior trim of a house and have many surfaces that need covering:
    All existing painted trim - black gloss, plastic guttering (painted and bare black), iron guttering (black gloss) and some new, bare wood.
    Firstly the final top coat I plan to use is Little Greene (Aquamarine colour) and it comes in oil and water based eggshell. Haven't chosen which one, but am inclined to go with oil. Any views or opinions welcomed.
    Secondly, I will need a good exterior primer that I can apply over all the different surfaces to be painted. After researching a bit, the best I have come across is Zinser Bullseye 123 plus. Any views or opinions welcomed. I was originally going to just get the white version and give everything 2 coats, but the chap at the Decorator centre said he could tint it for me. Would that be better? If so, how does the whole tinted primer idea work and which colour should I go for? The nearest match to my top coat? Also, the Bullseye 123 plus is water based. Is that ok for going over the existing solvent gloss? Will it affect the choice of top coat? ie. will oil based eggshell be ok on it, or do I then need to use water based eggshell?

    Any thoughts on these confusing matters will be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
     
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  3. Stephenhall1986

    Stephenhall1986

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    You shouldn't use an undercoat on plastic as the heat will cause it to expand and crack. You need to paint it using your eggshell. Saying that I wouldn't use Little Greene or any other of these fancy paints. There are better quality paints out there from the main suppliers ie Dulux, Crown and PPG. The zinessar product isn't the best one on the market either, I don't know why you've been specified it. You want to use the red tin of zinessar if you are going doing that route. Nonetheless, get some acrylic primer to paint your bare wood then apply two coats of oil eggshell everywhere.

    Hope this helps
     
  4. opps

    opps

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    I have only ever used Little Greene waterbased eggshell on a front door. The client specified it.

    The door needed repainting after a month or two- the client was selling the house so they weren't bothered about longevity.

    When clients aren't suckered in by slick advertising they let me specify paints. I generally recommend Dulux Trade Weathershield oil based gloss for exteriors. Although I am not a fan of gloss per se, it is easier to keep clean than eggshell. Ultimately I want to apply paints that will last as long as possible, I don't want clients complaining about the paint blistering and allowing the wood to rot.

    The DT Weathershield system includes a (waterbased) blue translucent primer, oil based undercoat and then oil based gloss. The UC can be tinted accordingly if necessary (within limitations, ie space in the tin for the pigment).

    DTW paints, and other systems designed for exterior use, contain biocides to help reduce the risk of fungus, lichen, etc adhering to the finish. Paints designed for interior use have (for good reasons) much lower levels of fungicidal agents.
     
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  5. seneca

    seneca

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    The bullseye 123 was specified by the chap at the Dulux decorator centre. He said he could tint it and it would stick to all surfaces, plastic included, so drains too. I think the red tin is coverstain and that does the job of obliterating the previous colour really well, but he wasn't sure it would stick everywhere.
     
  6. opps

    opps

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    The red Zinsser is BIN. It is a shellac based paint. It dries very quickly, much quicker than waterbased paints. It is a great product but very difficult to apply by brush (given that it dries so fast).

    http://www.zinsseruk.com/core/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/B-I-N.pdf

    AFAIK, BIN will adhere to a wider range of surfaces than 123.
     
  7. ic1927

    ic1927

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    DO NOT use BIN on exteriors, it's too brittle a coating. Alright for spot priming but that's about it as far as exteriors go.
     
  8. opps

    opps

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    Good point, Zinsser only recommend BIN as an exterior spot primer.

    Personally, I have only used it (outdoors) as a spot stain blocker to cover rust marks on exterior walls.
     
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