1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

Pin Nailer

Discussion in 'Tools and Materials' started by stealthwolf, 5 Sep 2019.

  1. stealthwolf

    stealthwolf

    Joined:
    20 May 2015
    Messages:
    534
    Thanks Received:
    34
    Location:
    Birmingham
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I'm toying with the idea of a pin nailer for helping pin bits of wood whilst the glue dries for simple woodworking projects. It would be quicker than me using a pin hammer, but space is at a premium. So instead of a compressor and air powered tool, I'm looking at electric or cordless options (I've already got a few Makita tools).

    What (if anything) would you recommend?
     
  2. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

    Joined:
    30 Sep 2011
    Messages:
    4,022
    Thanks Received:
    821
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Firstly, pneumatics are considerably cheaper than cordless, not to mention smaller, lighter, etc, but as you have Makitas already you'll probably want to take a look at the DBN500 (18g) - a peculiar looking gun, very expensive and large and I personally found unwieldy for an 18g nailer (I tried one a while back when we had glaziers on a job who were using them - they had them only because the firm had standardised on Makita LXT batteries for the cordless kit). Frankly I prefer even a Paslode 2nd fix gun to this, despite generally detesting gas guns. The next size up, the 16g DBN600 is similarly expensive and heavy, although more conventionally styled. but I wouldn't recommend that, either, having tried (and failed) to get one to sink 50mm pins into hardwood (American oak) during a dealer demo day. Both these tools are air over battery (i.e. they see battery power to compress air which in turn is used to drive the pin into the wood), so you'd have thought that on a prof4ssional tool they'd be able to sink 45 to 50mm nails into hardwood. The only other pinners sold by Makita are the little 23g DST221, etc models which are designed for tracking beading, etc on place. Again a "dear do" and with a lot of negative feelings expressed on the net (never used one, so can't say personally). TBH whilst Makita do a lot of things well (and maybe I'm a "fanboi"), I'm afraid that nailers aren't their forte IMHO

    But then the same could be said of Milwaukee 's first generation 2nd fix nailers (15, 16 and 18g), all of which have fallen well short of the mark (they tend to lock out if driven at any speed, or bump fired for more than 10 or 12 nails) - so much so that they have embarked on a "Gen 2" (ground up redesign) range which will start to appear in the USA from October (?) 2019 onwards. They look interesting

    I reckon that the best bet for cordless 2nd fix is currently the Hitachi 18 volt stuff. Again air over battery, these guns will sink 50mm pins in hardwood (15, 16 and 18g - tried them all). Hitachi also make a first fix gun which is comparable to the DW cordless in performance.

    To put this in perspctive, I currently use a DW 2nd generation 1st fix gun (DCN692 - the better 2-speed model) and 2nd generation 16g gun (DCN660). The DCN660 can't sink 50mm pins in some hardwoods which means that DW won't be selling me an 18g gun. This is despite having had success with their 1st generation guns (16g and 8g). So I, too , am looking at the market and at the moment Hitachi is the front runner for me, despite having a non-Makita battery
     
    Last edited: 5 Sep 2019
    • Thanks Thanks x 2
  3. stealthwolf

    stealthwolf

    Joined:
    20 May 2015
    Messages:
    534
    Thanks Received:
    34
    Location:
    Birmingham
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks for that J&K. Sounds very much like electric pin nailers just aren’t there at the same level as pneumatic ones. I’ll have a rethink because I didn’t want to spend £300-400 for something that won’t get as much as my other cordless tools.
     
  4. foxhole

    foxhole

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2006
    Messages:
    15,504
    Thanks Received:
    1,699
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I use a cheap brad gun for holding stuff while gluing.
     
  5. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

    Joined:
    30 Sep 2011
    Messages:
    4,022
    Thanks Received:
    821
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Well it's not quite that simple. Yes, cordless pinners are and always will be heavier and larger than gas nailers, but in terms of performance on a lot of second fix materials (e.g 18mm MDF architrave, 22mm softwood skirting, 18mm HW ply, 22mm chipboard, etc) they perform just as well as the equivalent gas gun. I say that with 10 years use of 1st and 2nd generation DW guns under my belt. Looking back DW got it almost right with the very first generation of 2nd fix cordless nailers apart from their poor performance on some hardwoods and the gawdawful lumpen battery system. The problem is that nobody has much improved on that until Hitachi (a firm with decades of industrial and trade pneumatic nailers experience) came along. If all you are doing is working with thinner/lighter materials and you don't intend to bang in hundreds of metres of skirting every week then you won't have problems with any of the tools I mentioned
     
  6. Sponsored Links
  7. stealthwolf

    stealthwolf

    Joined:
    20 May 2015
    Messages:
    534
    Thanks Received:
    34
    Location:
    Birmingham
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Which one do you use?
    All i’ve got planned so far is adding trim pieces to a wooden planter, and making a trellis. Nothing major.
     
  8. lostinthelight

    lostinthelight

    Joined:
    11 Feb 2016
    Messages:
    1,921
    Thanks Received:
    351
    Location:
    monmouthshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
  9. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

    Joined:
    30 Sep 2011
    Messages:
    4,022
    Thanks Received:
    821
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Combined nailer/staplers are generally awful as nailers. That is because the drive "pin" needs to be wide enough to accommodate the head of the staple, so when you do drive little 18 gauge pins with the things they tend to leave you with a staple crown width dent in the top of your workpiece. I've tried a few comnbined nailer/stapler tools over the years and the results have always been the same (probably OK if you are going to fill and sand back, though). Just saying
     
  10. foxhole

    foxhole

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2006
    Messages:
    15,504
    Thanks Received:
    1,699
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Have a cheap tacwise, nailer only does not staple.
     
  11. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2019
    Country:
    United Kingdom

    If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

    Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


    Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

     
Sponsored Links
Loading...

Share This Page