Pine scaffold board worktop resin

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I have fitted two oak worktops which look great but for the third being asked £1,400 for 3m length, half of which will be cut away for the hob and sink so settled for pine scaffold boards which are now sanded and ready for oiling.

But still lots of small crack and a few larger saw cuts which I am happy with but not sure if I should fill cracks with epoxy resin before oiling. So what epoxy should I use as the finish will be Osmo Polyx oil raw matt.

I am thinking of transparent and/or black so how would I make up a black epoxy or can it be bought ready prepared ?

I have found this for the transparent but it is glossy Are they all glossy ?

https://resin-pro.co.uk/product/transparent-epoxy-resin-1-6-kg/
 
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Both!

I have fitted two oak worktops which look great but for the third being asked £1,400 for 3m length, half of which will be cut away for the hob and sink so settled for pine scaffold boards which are now sanded and ready for oiling.
Scaffolding boards in an otherwise oak worktop set? Are you joking, too? It will probably look awful, but also scaff boards aren't fully seasoned, so may move a lot in service and in any case pine board is probably one of the least suitable materials you can use for a kitchen worktop - which is why nobody seems to offer them. Good luck trying to get a finish to stick to that, though...
 
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https://www.kitchenworktopsonline.co.uk/kitchen-worktop/pitch-pine/ Loads of companies offer pine worktops and kitchen islands and a combination of oak for show and pine for the rustic look worktop round the sink and hob. With resin infills and flooded with Osmo polx oil they last as long as oak, just more of a rustic look and cheaper. Rather that snearing maybe you should keep up with modern kitchem design Let me know how you get on https://www.simplythenest.com/simpl...to-make-kitchen-worktops-from-scaffold-boards. Good Luck
 
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Snearing? I seem to recall that lots of kitchen companies offer high gloss worktops, and we all know exactly how well they last in a real kitchen environment. Great for selling kitchens, ****e for the real world. Then there are solid surface worktops - just don't let the client know that they'll need to be resanded annually if they are a keen cook - and never leave red wine or tomato/curry sauce on a white worktop for any length of time as the stain will be a major headache to remove (same goes for light marbles and some granites). Similarly, oak in a kitchen where the client has an Aga and uses cast iron pans - that works well - I have dealt with a couple of those where copious quantities of oxallic acid and belt sanding get rid of the black stains, but the client was less than impressed that neither the kitchen showroom nor the fitter had warned them of the potential issues, presumably because they were pig ignorant and "keeping up with fashion". There were some very good reasons why they traditionally chose certain timber species for the job rather than being victims of fashion

Pine tables generally aren't soaked regularly, have spills which are left, have pots left to drain in them, etc and they are made from kilned timber not unfinished crap off a building site
 
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So what? I've built bars in posh restaurants with rustic oak nailed on the front which had been left in a midden covered in chicken dung for years to age them. Very stylish, very chic, but ultimately a triumph of style over quality (and the decos had to work miracles to seal in the smell). As an interior fitout joiner for many years I think I've installed every second rate crackpot idea that designers could come up with. At least in 10 years time one of my ex-apprentices will probably be ripping these out to, probably to replace it with some other piece of designer tat because that sort of "post industrial" stuff is just another fad - and somewhere else for the less talented to sell overpriced, overhyped garbage to rubes
 
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If you use epoxy resin you won't be able to coat it with anything other than epoxy resin. Regardless, the epoxy resin should suffice as a finish. I have no idea how scratch resistant it will be though, but if you have a thick, and expensive coat, I guess some scratches could be polished out.
 
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I would add that the tables in your google link have been extensively machined/milled.

I often work on scaffolding. I frequently see hardened screws drilled in to them that have snapped and paint spills. If one of those nails breaks a planner thicknesser blade, it ain't cheap to replace the blade.

I appreciate that you might want to salvage timber but if it costs more than buying new timber is it really worth it? And have you considered what it will look like in a year when the boards start warping? How much will it coast to rip the whole lot out?

There is a very good reason why solid worktops are made from small sections (read:staves) of timber. It isn't because anyone is trying to rip you off, it is because that is the most stable option.
 
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If you really must use scaffold boards, then powder filler mixed with a little artist's powder colour can be used to colour-match with the wood. The filler when hardened and sanded would need protecting with a durable clear varnish. Not an ideal solution, though.
 
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https://www.kitchenworktopsonline.co.uk/kitchen-worktop/pitch-pine/ Loads of companies offer pine worktops and kitchen islands and a combination of oak for show and pine for the rustic look worktop round the sink and hob. With resin infills and flooded with Osmo polx oil they last as long as oak, just more of a rustic look and cheaper. Rather that snearing maybe you should keep up with modern kitchem design Let me know how you get on https://www.simplythenest.com/simpl...to-make-kitchen-worktops-from-scaffold-boards. Good Luck


Erm, the pitch pine worktop in your first link is not pitch pine- it is pitch pine effect laminate. I have not found any company that provides real pitch pine worktops (that said, I have not searched extensively).

With regards to your second link... In the comments section, Alice is warned by numerous people that scaffold boards as worktops may present a serious risk to health, either as a result of the chemicals used to treat them, chemicals that soak in to them or even jobs where they were used on asbestos removal. Her default response is that life is a gamble. I note that she doesn't mention potential health risks in her blog...

I do not want to come across as being condescending. I do genuinely think that if you follow her advice, you may well regret in in a couple of years.
 
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If you really must use scaffold boards, then powder filler mixed with a little artist's powder colour can be used to colour-match with the wood. The filler when hardened and sanded would need protecting with a durable clear varnish. Not an ideal solution, though.

As a decorator, I expect powered based fillers to blow over the years when used on timber, especially on dynamic joints. TBH, any filler will though. MS polymers will offer a decent amount of movement (more than epoxy resin fillers) but they cannot be sanded (or dyed).
 
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Erm, the pitch pine worktop in your first link is not pitch pine- it is pitch pine effect laminate. I have not found any company that provides real pitch pine worktops (that said, I have not searched extensively).
Maybe because nobody has imported much of it since just after WWI due to clear felling of the reserves in Canada and the USA? Between the wars parana pine started to supplant it rapidly. When you see pitch pine today it is invariably recycled, being resawn from beams pulled out of demolished industrial mills - and there is a lot less of it around as most of the mills that could be demolished are now long gone, making pitch pine more expensive than oak. For surfaces in contact with food that immediately gives you a problem - is it contaminated with anything toxic? It is really awful stuff to machine - the name gives it away though, pitch pine, which translates to it gumming up every piece of machinery which touches it as well as gumming up sanding belts double quick. Think about how much machining and sanding goes into a staved worktop and it becomes obvious why nobody wants to use it for that. So, pitch pine - really good structural timnber but naff all use for furniture and interior fittings, not that I'd expect a designer to understand that fact. The one good use I have seen for it is exterior joinery such as replacement door frames and sash window sills where it's rot-resistant properties can be a major plus, although it can be a so and so to seal and finish

As a decorator, I expect powered based fillers to blow over the years when used on timber, especially on dynamic joints. TBH, any filler will though. MS polymers will offer a decent amount of movement (more than epoxy resin fillers) but they cannot be sanded (or dyed).
As a joiner I invariably use 2-pack fillers where a painted finish is involved, but they generally aren't suitable for clear finishes of any type. I have also done "rustic oak" flooring where to fill the gaps we fixed plywood blanks beneath the holes and then filled them with epoxy resin and a coloured filler, sanded over then clear finished the surface with clear epoxy afterwoods to get the required wear characteristics. Looks impressive, but the problem with doing this is that potential timber movement is a nightmare so the stuff has to be kilned (to match the RH in the building once it is in use, so generally 6 to 8% - far lower than normal, but right for a centrally heated building), checked and installed promptly upon delivery to reduce the possibility of movement (and no wet plastering afterwards!). Done the same to encapsulate coins on a floor in front of a bar in Spain some years back. Looked great, but needed resanding and polishing out every 18 months to 2 years to keep it looking good
 
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