Planning permission for lean to shed.

Discussion in 'Building Regulations and Planning Permission' started by jawilba, 1 Aug 2019.

  1. jawilba

    jawilba

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    I live in an end of terrace house with a 1.5m to 2m wide concrete path down the side. I want to block this off to make more secure and provide more privacy. I thought about making a lean to shed in the space. Nothing huge 2x3m and under 2.5m high.

    I spoke to my local council planning dept and they said if the shed is attached it will be classified as an extension and planning would be needed. This is because it's a different material from the main house (wood shed and brick and rendered house.) I forgot to check if this was because I live in a conservation area. If I use same materials as house planning probably wouldn't be needed.

    It would be much more costly and time consuming so just thought I'd check to see if there was some solution that doesnt require planning.

    Thanks

    Jason
     
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  3. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Call it a conservatory.
     
  4. Notch7

    Notch7

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    Thats not a joke either -that is a solution!

    Get a nice sign for the door of your your shed 'Welcome to the Conservatory' :ROFLMAO:
     
  5. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    And put a plant in it. (y)
     
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  6. jawilba

    jawilba

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    Well I'm happy to call it whatever and put a plant in but wouldn't a conservatory need to be accessed from the house or can they also be added to a house but only accessible from the garden?

    Hopefully I can get away with something like this. A few people in my street have done it likely without planning and I would to except I'm probably not going to be in this house for more than another couple of years. Don't want issues when it comes to selling.
     
  7. Captain Ahab

    Captain Ahab

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    Hi I had exactly same situation as you have - an end of terrace with 2m gap. I decided to self build a lean to conservatory to use as a utility room and trawled ebay and gumtree for years before I found one exactly the right dimensions ! 7.5m long x 2m width.
    Entry is from the back garden but plan to knock through a door into kitchen in the future.

    Because its a fairly new house (10years old) we were advised to apply for a "Certificate of Lawful Development" as permitted devolpment rights had been removed on the estate. That cost around £130 ,did the scale drawings myself and it took about 8 weeks to get the certificate which will definately help in future if we come to sell.
     
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  9. jawilba

    jawilba

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    Just had email from planning dept and it seems like I'm stuck. Looks like any structure or outbuilding on the side elevation wil planning permission as I'm in a conservation area.

    Guess I'll have to come back to this when I've got a bit more free time. Shame.
     
  10. - so where did
    'This is because it's a different material from the main house (wood shed and brick and rendered house.) ' come from :?:
     
  11. jawilba

    jawilba

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    Been a bit busy of late. This is what I was sent by the planning dept. I can't find link for the class a and e references but think it's to do with permitted development in conservation area.

    If the structure is attached to the house, we would class it as an extension which would be considered against the criteria under Class A. Should it not be attached to the house, we would class it as an outbuilding which would be assessed against the criteria under Class E.


    Should it not be attached to the house, as the property is within a Conservation Area, any outbuilding to the side of the house would require planning consent.


    Should it be attached to the house, this includes any covered walkways, conservatories etc then it must be set back by 1 metre from the principal elevation, not exceed more than 3 metres or more than 50% of the width of the original dwellinghouse and not exceed a height of 3 metres on a flat roof or 3 metres to the eaves and 4 metres to the ridge on a pitched roof. The materials, in terms of their external appearance, must match those of the existing house as far as practicable.

    Looks like no quick and easy solution.
     
  12. paulrockliffe

    paulrockliffe

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    Sounds like they're letting you build it under Permitted Development, so long as it matches the existing. Worth checking that the Conservation Area hasn't removed you Permitted Development rights, because often they do and if so, that advice is incorrect.

    Personally I'd aim to build it to match under PD if you can as it'll be so much nicer, but appreciate I've no idea of your circumstances and priorities, or even what the house looks like.
     
  13. Notch7

    Notch7

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    I would consider the level of risk.

    If you dont have nosy neighbours, it might be worth building and see if you get away with it.

    If it gets spotted, you may end up having to take it down.
     
  14. garyo

    garyo

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    Exactly this. Assuming you already have a sizable front gate on the alley then I'd build the roof and support 'legs' set back 500mm then leave it there for six months to see if any of the neighbours object or cause the council to give you trouble, then gradually spend more money enclosing it with walls and secure doors.
     
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