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Power and CAT5 Run for Garden Shed

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by Beebopper, 23 Oct 2014.

  1. Beebopper

    Beebopper

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    Hi All,

    I'm in the process of finalising a garden shed build that will double as an office, have to get the power and data sorted out and wanted to check a couple of things on cabling requirements first, cos I don't want to have to do it again!

    I will be running all cables and then getting an electrician in to terminate and sign it all off. I'll sort the CAT5 as I know how that's done and doesn't need approval.

    Power load, will be lights, a heater, computer, monitor etc and phone chargers.

    Firstly Power:

    I have a 17m run from the consumer unit in the house to where a consumer unit will go in the shed, I believe I can use armoured cable and run it outside, it will run along the side of my house (clipped to the wall) and then underground for 1m in conduit to the side of the shed.

    Question is - Do I need a specific type of cable for this? I am not sure what to get, any type to look for and what size to use?


    Now the network:

    I have a 10m run for this, and will run 2x lengths and terminate into RJ45 sockets in the shed and indoors next to my router to patch in. But I have seen various types of CAT5 cable, including outdoor grade, duct grade and standard. I was thinking of running the cat5 in conduit and clipping it away from the armoured power along the side of the house and then into a separate duct under the 1m underground section.

    What type of cat5 cable should I be using, if in duct is indoor cable sufficient or do I still need outdoor for the cold, damp etc? And des it need to be ducted outside or can it be clipped like the power?

    Thanks all![/b]
     
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  3. ekmdgrf

    ekmdgrf

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    Engage your sparky before the work starts. Everyone on here will have their own opinion of how it should be cabled. Your sparky will have his/her own view too. Also, they'll likely not be very happy using an existing cable that disappears into the ground and reappears somewhere else, even if you insist that it has just been laid.

    On the Cat 5 front, outdoor grade has a 2nd covering around the cable that is more resistant to UV (read: sunlight). I presume duct grade is more water resistant. If it's easy enough to do, I would duct it all the way since sunlight is simply evil.
     
  4. sparkiemike

    sparkiemike

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    Yes you do, the type and size will be decided by your electrician when they carry out the design, unless you are taking responsibility for the design?

    I would be looking at some armoured CAT5E as it will be the most versatile e.g suitable for clipping to a wall, ducts, direct burying and protection against moisture and it is tough and UV stable - http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Products/CACAT5EslashSWA.html
     
  5. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    Are you hoping that that "signing off" will extend to him certifying through his scheme organisers that he did the work and it complied with the Building Regulations, or have you applied for Building Regulations approval?
     
  6. Beebopper

    Beebopper

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    Right Ok, thanks for the input. Advise taken and will engage sparky before sorting the electric side. Cat 5 wise I'll use outdoor grade in a duct all the way!

    Cheers
     
  7. winston1

    winston1

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    You don't need a consumer unit in the shed. Sockets can be run direct, and lights via a fused connection unit. At the house end run the shed cable from a 20 amp MCB in the house consumer unit.
     
  8. DIYWell

    DIYWell

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    Yep, upgrade the cat5. Use cat6 since the price difference it's that bad. Terminate as cat5 if you want to derate. Ideally get your paws on a Fluke cable analyser to check on bandwidth/transmission problems, not a network tester which just tells you if there is continuity. Analyser also has the advantage that if problems occur later, you can remeasure and compare the previous results to see if it's the drop cable that's a fault.

    Armoured cable may be a solution, but ideally you're looking for not just UV stable, but able to withstand water soaking and low temperatures. when normal cable gets cold, perhaps below -5, it becomes brittle, cracks, water ingress, bye bye bandwidth.

    Option 2, use any reasonable cable but be prepared to replace regularly.
     
  9. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    Hang on a minute.

    You have already said "I will be running all cables and then getting an electrician in to terminate and sign it all off."

    Had you just been assuming that you'd be able to do that, without actually finding an electrician who was agreeable?


    Make sure it's large enough, and installed in a way, to allow replacement or extra cables to be pulled through later. It's to be an office - who's to say you might not in the future want a dedicated ISP connection, possibly fibre?

    At the very least install a couple of spare runs of Cat6 so you could have your own ADSL and/or phone service there.
     
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  11. Beebopper

    Beebopper

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    Ok good feedback thanks - I'm not in the trade so a bit naieve on what you can and cannot do, hence my asking on here.

    So sparky came out at the weekend and has advised 6mm cable to be used for the run, and will be clipped to the house / run underground in flexi conduit. I know whats what there.

    Ref cat5e v's cat6, I think I'm gonna use cat5e as the cost difference v's gains are not there. Cat5e is suitable for what I will need.
     
  12. Beebopper

    Beebopper

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    Quick question re underground cabling:

    I will be running the electric and cat5 underground for approx. 2m, and am aware that it needs to go down 600mm minimum and be laid on sand. Just wondering if solid conduit is best or the flexible stuff:

    This
    http://www.toolstation.com/shop/Electrical/d190/Conduit+Trunking/sd2743/PVC+Round+Conduit/p36467

    or this
    http://www.toolstation.com/shop/Ele...king/sd2743/Polypropylene+Flex+Conduit/p47607

    I have used the flexi stuff outdoors before and over time the flexi part seems to go thin and erode away. Maybe I had a rubbish type though?

    I do know they need to be in separate conduits!

    Opinions welcome, thanks...
     
  13. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    Neither sort you mention - they are both inappropriate.

    Get this type:

    http://www.drainageonline.co.uk/Ducting/Black-Twinwall-Duct-x-50m-coil.htm

    (other suppliers are available)

    Twin-wall, smooth inside for ease of pulling cables through, ribbed outside for strength. Comes with a draw-cord installed so no messing about with a vacuum cleaner (or a hungry ferret and a piece of chicken :LOL: ). The drawcord is a bit pathetic though - might be a good idea before you bury it to use the supplied one to pull some stronger rope through.

    Do make sure that the bends are swept enough for cable to be pulled through or you'll have to dig it up. Make sure you prepare the trench properly, that it's deep enough and that you put warning tape down. And take photos at stages if you want an electrician to use it.
     
  14. Beebopper

    Beebopper

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    Ok thanks for that info, the cable duct looks good, but I only need 2m not 50m! If I try searching for alternatives, what should I look for, twinwall duct? Obviously not the type I posted earlier. :)
     
  15. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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  16. Beebopper

    Beebopper

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  17. Beebopper

    Beebopper

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    I've had a second sparky in today to look and quote for work, as I'm having problems contacting the first guy. He's got a different view on cable and says 2.5mm armoured is more than enough, the other guy said 10mm is overkill but 6mm is what he'd install.

    I'd be running a 1.5kw heater, lights (led) and computer equipment. Not much more, maybe a phone charger. 17m run, any ideas guys, I am confused now!

    He also wants to run the internal power to lights over the top of celotex that is installed in the air gap between the roof and insulation, does this need certain cable, as it will get hot as the roof is black epdm and gets sun most of the day in the summer.
     
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