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Powered screwdriver/drill

Discussion in 'Tools and Materials' started by Mbaigent, 14 Nov 2011.

  1. Mbaigent

    Mbaigent

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    Hi all

    I am about to build a garden shed which will take a lot of screws so I need to buy something to make things a bit easier.

    I have got way behind in DIY tech, could anyone suggest a low cost powered tool up to putting 90mm screws into softwood. It will probably not get much regular use after the shed is built.

    I don't mind if it is mains powered or cordless, but I do not understand the battery technolgy.

    Any advice or tips gratefully accepted.

    ATB
    Mark
     
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  3. r896neo

    r896neo

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    for long screws like that buy a cheap corded drill, cheap battery ones might not have enough torque and will run out quickly due to the size.

    A cheap bosch impact drill would be a good bet for 30 quid ish better yet can you borrow one?
     
  4. Mbaigent

    Mbaigent

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    Hiya


    Thanks for that, does the drill need anything specific to double up as a screw driver, like variable speed etc or do all modern drills work ok as screwdrives?

    I should say that I normally use screw bits in a brace and bit!


    I don't like borrowing tools, a selfish thing as I do not like people borrowing my axes, adzes etc

    ATB
    Mark
    http://carvedfromwood.blogspot.com/
     
  5. Mbaigent

    Mbaigent

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    I have had a look around and the £30 Bosch seems ideal, TVM
     
  6. merlin50

    merlin50

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    [​IMG]
    Its a shed use nails
     
  7. Mbaigent

    Mbaigent

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    I made the huge mistake of buying a cheap shed in kit form, repeated hammer blows would probably destroy it :(

    When it is built I will probably have to beef it up with some bigger timber to stop it blowing down in a breeze!
     
  8. big-all

    big-all

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    i would go for an 18v 1hr charge 2 batteries otherwise frustration will kill you lol
    if you get one with hammer action you can put up shelves
     
  9. noseall

    noseall

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    Jeepers!

    First use a bog standard cordless screwdriver and you will be amazed.

    Then use a powerful one.

    Then use a standard impact driver.

    Then use a heavy duty pro' impact with lith-ion batteries and you will be skipping around the house begging for something to be fixed.:cool:

    A good one will drive a 4" - 12 screw through any timber and beyond without the problems of torque breaking your wrist. My (Milwaukee) impact needed new brushes, so i dug out my old Makita (non impact) and it was depressing having to push on the drill and suffer the the thing trying to twist.

    I now own two pro impacts. One to wash and one to wear. :mrgreen:
     
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  11. r896neo

    r896neo

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    30 quid on a bosch corded that will last years or 80+ on a battery tool that will be used so infrequently the batteries will be useless in a few years
     
  12. big-all

    big-all

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    mains drill are not much good for screwing the electronics don't like slow speed high torque applications and judging the last few turns is an art in its self so the drill willl coast to a stop without sticking out or overdoing it
     
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  13. screech

    screech

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  14. joe-90

    joe-90

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  15. JimLoskot

    JimLoskot

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    buy a cheap battery drill of 14v or 18v from the likes of aldi or lidl when they have them in. will do the job fine
     
  16. Mbaigent

    Mbaigent

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    Hi all

    Thanks for the replies.

    I have a cordless on wmy want list, in the meantime I have finished the workshop using my good old brace and bit :)

    Mark
     
  17. joe-90

    joe-90

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    It's nice to see the old methods back in use.
     
  18. DIYnot Local

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