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Propagating Hibiscus

Discussion in 'In the Garden' started by JohnD, 2 Sep 2010.

  1. JohnD

    JohnD

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    I have a hardy old Hibiscus bush in the garden, with a blueish flower. It has made seedlings, mostly blue or violet but a few more attractive, including one with a white flower with red throat. I would like to propagate this.

    I have not had much luck with cuttings in the past.

    What suggestions please?
     
  2. Lorena

    Lorena

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    ..it might be a bit late for this year as it should be done in July, but worth a try.

    Take 3-4 inch cuttings with a heel from non-flowering lateral shoots.
    Insert cuttings in sandy compost and preferably put in greenhouse as they need 16 deg C and overwinter in there.
    Pot up next Spring when they should have rooted.

    The white one with a red throat sounds like a variety called 'Dorothy Crane' :-

    http://www.botanica.org.uk/Plants/Ornamental/onlineshop/hibiscussyriacusdorothycrane.html
     
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  4. JohnD

    JohnD

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    thanks

    Can I not use a peaty seed and cuting compost? Or can I try and mix my own by adding coarse sand or grit?

    no greenhouse, but I have got a windowsill

    Can't be a named variety, as it is just a seedling from my old plant.

    edited:

    here it is


    grown up next to some blue ones
     
  5. Lorena

    Lorena

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    yes you can use that type of compost, anything that's gritty or sandy so allows quick drainage.

    It's a nice looking flower, also similar to another named one called 'Hamabo'. There are a number of varieties available like that grown from seeds or 'sports' where a shoot produces a different colour flower from the original. Perhaps yours is unique :)
    Your main plant looks like one called 'Blue Bird', don't know if that rings a bell or not.
     
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