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Protecting Timber Frame during build stage

Discussion in 'Building' started by coxsox, 23 Apr 2012.

  1. coxsox

    coxsox

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    Hi,

    Just about to start constructing my timber frame extension and due to space limitations on site and time, I will need to construct the frame in situ. I do plan on covering what I can of the extension and frame in sheeting to protect it from the elements, but as the build may take a few months is there anything I should consider above DPC ?

    thanks
     
  2. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Are you sure that the frame needs to be made in-situ?

    I can't understand why the panels can't be made on site, and then assembled when necessary

    The build should not take a few months. Once the panels are made, you should be able to erect an extension shell in a day or two, and weather seal it
     
  3. coxsox

    coxsox

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    I suspected this would be questioned, unfortunately having a full time job only leaves evenings and weekends to complete this job single handedly.

    Even with an army of people I would struggle to assemble, clad and tile an extension in a day.....
     
  4. TheHandyAndy

    TheHandyAndy

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    Scaffolding and a tarpaulin? Build a temporary structure to house the entire extension?
     
  5. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    You don't assemble clad and tile in a day - you fix all the panels together, and drop the roof structure on in a day or two. Cladding and tiling comes later

    Even on evenings and weekends, it is still possible to make the panels up yourself, cover them easily in a stack once made, and then once they are all ready, then assembly it

    You can either staple the membrane to each panel as you make it and then when assembled, its largely waterproof, or make the panels up bare and then wrap in membrane all at once

    It's just not practical to try and assemble a frame from scratch in-situ - even more so if you are working alone

    If you want to make it even easier, just make the panels up as standard 8x4 sections with no openings, and then once assembled then cut and form the openings
     
  6. theoldun

    theoldun

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    Nothing wrong in stick building in situ, that’s the way we always work especially if we are doing a two storey house. It is a lot easier, quicker and more cost effective than making up panels.
    Keep your timber sheeted until you require to use it, but do not worry about any sticks standing up out in the rain The wind and air will soon dry them out to a reasonable moisture content.
    Making up panels is a waste of time and materials on a small job.
    Always form your openings as you go or leave the sticks out where your openings are and then drop back and fill in. Give a lot of thought to layout and make sure sticks are directly underneath joists or roof timbers. Run a double header plate at half centres to wall p[late to stiffen sticks up.
    Your main concern should be as to what U value you wish to achieve and what size timbers and construction you are using to achieve this U value.
    Regards oldun
     
  7. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Oh I see. Rather than make panels up easily on the ground and then just joining them together in one go, struggle with bits of timber - plumbing, levelling individually, and then offering the boards up and nailing them, and then nailing up and down hop-ups etc. and then covering up and uncovering as you go

    Sounds more cost and time effective to me :rolleyes:

    Don't forget the OP is working alone

    And also don't forget that assembled panels will always form a sturdier frame than timber made in-situ with skew nailing
     
  8. AronSearle

    AronSearle

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    Well, ignoring stick vs panel built here is a few tidbits.

    The timber itself can be happily exposed for several weeks or months before you need to worry about any risk of decay, sometimes years (though not recommended).

    The main thing is to make sure the timber is dry (<20% moisture content) before you start plaster boarding and sealing it in.

    Panel products are more prone to damage from moisture, most external grade panels can be exposed for a few weeks, but it should be avoided, particularly with OSB.

    Once you have your frame, it should be a quick job to install your roof panels and cover with a membrane.

    Then you have sheathing, once you start fitting sheathing, you should reasonably get the breather membrane on straight away, which protects the OSB.

    Basically if you build smart, you shouldn't need to take any special measure to protect anything.
     
  9. theoldun

    theoldun

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    We are builders and contractors, who try to be competitive enough to cover our wage bill, overheads and make a reasonable profit each year.
    If we thought for one minute that for a small company, we could earn more money by making up panels both labour wise and material wise for timber frame building in preference to stick building then we would assure you that we would be first in the queue for making up panels, however we know from past experience that stick building is the cheapest and fastest system for this type of construction
    For one person working on his own, it is easy to stand up plumb two sticks with tempory diagonal bracing at what ever centres you like ready to receive top plate.
    You do not rely on skew nailing for stability or strength, these all come from the external sheathing be it 12mm ply or OSB.
    Coxsox, repeat again, be more concerned with actual frame construction and U value you wish to achieve, then worrying about timber standing out in the elements.
    Regards. oldun
     
  10. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

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