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Q re neighbours "new" extension

Discussion in 'Building Regulations and Planning Permission' started by ClockPie, 29 Jun 2020.

  1. ClockPie

    ClockPie

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    Hi

    Our neighbours had PP and built an extension, the external side wall was mostly existing and was extended and guttering installed. This is in keeping with previous works before we moved in, no issue.

    However, the new roof and guttering is poorly done, in heavy rain 1/4 of the roof run off is guided through one tile "dip" and hence a huge amount of water just pours off and clears he gutter.

    In light/medium rain, water goes between the facia and the gutter (and down the wall) and also, we think, below the tiles onto the felt (which is lower than the facia/gutter) and hence water goes down the inside of the facia down the wall.

    We believe the roof tiles are normal roof tiles and not designed for very shallow flat roofs, they are also badly fitted. We believe the guttering is too small, under spec, no membrane etc - and only one downpipe (that until recently went into an overflowing water butt).

    4yrs after initially telling them of the water overflowing, the wall is damaged, paint/render cracked and coming off, and green alge at the bottom, of the wall and lots of excessive water on our land.

    A builder found nothing wrong (lol) and now covid is stopping any action (yeah right)

    The wall is on boundary but only we see it - we maintain other garden walls and are happy to paint - but I'm not wanting to spend time/money repairing/repainting their wall every couple of years due to damage they cause. Also I get excessive rainwater literally pouring over.

    No comments on deeds or PP

    4yrs is enough patience and putting up with poor excuses.

    But what are next steps? Have a more formal argument? Report to building control? Legal house insurance avenue? Or just put up and look at a grotty wall?

    (pic below shows some of the damage and obvious areas where water is running down. Its worse in other places. Water can be seen running down the wall and "clearing" the gutter - just hard to photograph when its raining!)



     
    Last edited: 29 Jun 2020
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  3. freddiemercurystwin

    freddiemercurystwin

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    Grotty wall, if you pee them off they could paint Screw You Mr Meldrew on wall in big red writing.
     
  4. ClockPie

    ClockPie

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    (pics added to OP)

    Really - is that how it is? That'd be a push as despite being invited to look at the damage/mess I'm yet to be taken up on the offer. The c**p roof and guttering is new with this extension - so surprised if they can do that and not actively maintain it - that would be like me redirecting my downpipe and squirting it over the wall!

    On a serious note, I'm certain each house has painted their own side of the walls for >50 years - just a shame its what it is :(

    (edit - the most "important" bit for me is the excessive water coming over - our house corner is close to the pics, and we've fought this v old house very hard to negate damp/condensation/water/drain issues - and don't want their excess water to deal with too)
     
  5. Ian H

    Ian H

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    I’d drill some holes at the bottom so they can have their water back.
     
  6. ClockPie

    ClockPie

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    lol - I am trying to be nice!

    Would building control have noticed/signed off a 10' roof pitch angle with double roman clay tiles (min angle is 22.5' I believe?).
     
  7. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Whats the actual problem? "I don't like the look of it" does not count.
     
  8. ClockPie

    ClockPie

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    Nothing to do with looks whatsoever - it is the damage caused and potential damage caused by excess water

    1 - the roof/guttering structure is not fit for purpose, so rain water pours down damaging the wall, causing paint/render damage and algae to grow (arguably cosmetic - only we can see it - arguably damaging our "garden wall" (aka "their house wall" - same thing - it was a garden wall they simply used to put the roof on to.
    2 - there is excessive water from the roof that in heavy rain, the water clears the gutter and pours onto our garden path under 1m away from our house, and by pour I mean pour - a torrent - and I do not wish to start suffering from water damage


    I'm surprised at the lack of empathy and guidance here - I thought it was within normal expectations to have a new extension finished to a standard that does not cause damage to "my garden wall" or inflict me with their rain water run off. Its a new extension and the guttering is in my air space. Something not approved in writing, and would not mind if there was no damage caused. The look/type I don't care about, its the damage caused which will continue till the route cause is fixed.

    If my expectations are off the mark I will take note and have to review my thoughts as to possible actions.

    I guess I'll shoot an email off to council building control as they may/should've signed it off, or perhaps haven't been notified its finished yet.

    And if its all fine and my problem, I'll ask nicely again and perhaps get some sealant and adhesive flashing and bodge it - it is on my land afterall.
     
    Last edited: 29 Jun 2020
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  10. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Building control wont be interested 4 years down the line.

    Your only recourse would be action under statutory or private nuisance, but you must be able to show actual damage or loss or impact on your health. From the description there is no damage to your property. Also you mention water run off in heavy rain, not in normal rain, and that again is not really something that's actionable.
     
  11. frutbunn

    frutbunn

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    If the work was carried out illegally without B Regs they are statute barred from taking enforcement due to the time elapsed.
    Assuming it had B Regs and it is the local authority they would be able to confirm if they have completed the work, its not unusual for the final inspection to still be outstanding.
    If it is a private inspector the local authority will be able to confirm this and, in theory, confirm if the private inspector has completed the work (in practice some are often late or just "forget" this notification, quite a few are late with the initial notice as well).
    Your first port of call is the local authority.
    Interestingly there was a time when the regs didn't compel RWP's to be fitted, but if fitted the RWP's had to comply.
     
  12. cdbe

    cdbe

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    Do that, move on, a bit of guttering and some plastic eaves trays won't cost much (and is all they would ever do no matter what you throw at them). Book a holiday with the money you won't be paying a solicitor.
     
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  13. ClockPie

    ClockPie

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    The felt-covered roof wood is sadly about 1.75" BELOW the top of the gutter - with the ends of the tiles on top of two battens above that. So the eaves trays would only work between the battens and tiles and indeed stop 50% of the issues. (tested with some water proof gaffa tape which has proved point of principle to reduce the water) If this would solve all I'd JFDI.

    40% of the issues is the water running under the tiles/battens and to the back of the facia and then out the bottom/against the wall - and not really a way to get that back into the gutter - without having the entire end of the roof redone, facia lowered, guttering replaced etc which I could not do without other imacts)

    (10% of the issues in heavy rain could be sorted by a "plate" to catch the torrent and divert back to gutter, though that'd then probably overflow the entire length.)



    Thanks for all the advice, seems to be the nice neighbour route of asking nicely (again) - and then if no action do what I can as well as I can to minimise future damage and just get on with it.

    Thanks
     
  14. garyo

    garyo

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    Can you take a picture of this, and you may get some better advice of quick practical ways to 'JFDI' as you say. Based on your description I can't quite comprehend how badly it must have been set out...
     
  15. ClockPie

    ClockPie

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    Thanks, will take pics and probably start a more focused thread in the appropriate forum

    As a taster, imagine standard double roman tiles on a 10' slope with 2x 50mm high battens on top of each other supporting them, and under that, flat roof with felt. So tiles >2" above the felt. Vertical PVC fascia board boxes in who knows what, and ends just under the tiles (hence 1.75" drop on the inside to the felt. And the guttering at the top of the fascia board. (not supported enough so it bows, not wide enough or deep enough for the flow off the roof.

    Cosmetically, from ground level looks OK to be honest. Hides a multitude of sins!!
     
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