Raise floor of conservatory

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Hi

I'm looking to transfer my conservatory to a proper room with a solid roof and new glazing frames. And want it to adhere to building regs so I can remove the French doors.

It has electric sockets, a small radiator and electric underfloor heating under a tiled ceramic floor already so I'm hoping it's been built to a relatively decent spec considering its i conservatory. The problem is the floor is about 110mm lower than the lounge which joins it and I want to run new carpet/skirting throughout both rooms and remove the adjoining french doors.

What's the best way to raise the floor to the same level as the lounge. I was thinking elotexc/chipboard floating floor? However what do I do near the conservatory door, this would mean the celotex is exposed if you opened the door when it rained and that can't be right. Could I get the door put in higher and brick up underneath, although that would mean a none standard sized tiny door?
 
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want it to adhere to building regs so I can remove the French doors
How much glazing is there presently?


I'm hoping it's been built to a relatively decent spec considering its a conservatory
Surely you mean in spite of the fact it is a conservatory?

Sounds to me like you need to knock down a re-build as an extension. That would be the wisest in this case considering the floor, roof, glazing, foundations etc.
 
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Yes that's exactly what I meant but it's a typo but after finding out it's over 15 years old it's still obviously poor hence why I want to fix it

Currently it has a polycarb roof, dwarf wall and glazing everywhere else, it's an Edwardian shape about 7m wide and 3m deep. Knock down and start again unfortunately isn't within my budget as I don't want to remortgage or take out a loan to fund this.
 
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Picture always helps
 

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A new roof is not going to significantly affect the heat loss or the sun scorch. The best you could hope for is a lashed-up hybrid that is unlikely to satisfy building regulations and will likely cause a headache if you want to sell.

I'd demolish.
 
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Haha well that doesn't sound good, perhaps I was being optimistic on what could be done, might have to just remain a massive cupboard then!
 
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Hi

I'm looking to transfer my conservatory to a proper room with a solid roof and new glazing frames. And want it to adhere to building regs so I can remove the French doors.

It has electric sockets, a small radiator and electric underfloor heating under a tiled ceramic floor already so I'm hoping it's been built to a relatively decent spec considering its i conservatory. The problem is the floor is about 110mm lower than the lounge which joins it and I want to run new carpet/skirting throughout both rooms and remove the adjoining french doors.

What's the best way to raise the floor to the same level as the lounge. I was thinking elotexc/chipboard floating floor? However what do I do near the conservatory door, this would mean the celotex is exposed if you opened the door when it rained and that can't be right. Could I get the door put in higher and brick up underneath, although that would mean a none standard sized tiny door?

We done exactly this as you have said and never looked back the roof is now quite no noise of the rain lashing down cool in the summer warm in the winter we used 100mm celotex and 18mm chip to bring our floor up with wooden floor through the kitchen into the conservatory
 
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Do as you intend as long as you accept that it will not enhance the value of the place by much (but if it makes the space comfortable and usable then that has a value to you) and is unlikely to comply with Building Regs as a habitable room unless you demolish and start again.
The celotex door sketch- if you can move that gutter downpipe to the corner of the conservatory you'll be able to lift the existing door (make a cutout in that side piece of Twinwall) and run an extra course and a half of bricks below it to finish the doorway. A dwarf door will appeal to nobody, a lifted door will merely look a bit odd.
Floor- if you can get the depth for 100mm Celotex and floating 18mm chipboard that would be ideal. 90mm would be nearly as effective. Take the French windows off now if you want, stash them in the garage, put them back on if/when you want to sell (do tell your house insurers that you are doing this cos you are removing the fire separation between conservatory and house and this may affect your cover). Or just live with them, maybe use bifolds instead (so the side leaves open as well).
As a matter of interest, is the floor in the lounge solid or suspended? If suspended, has that conservatory blocked any airbricks (or are there any airbricks in the conservatory)
 
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Do as you intend as long as you accept that it will not enhance the value of the place by much
What would bother me is the fact that the OP wants to remove the internal doors and turn into a bona fide extension. If the OP intends selling in the near future, then a non-compliant hybrid may become an expensive headache.
 
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Thanks for ideas, not sure about the lounge to be honest, can't see any airbricks outside at all anywhere around the house. It has laminate down in lounge that was put in by previous owners but I want to running matching flooring from lounge into conservatory when completed. How can you tell what floor is there without taking it up?

I'm maybe considering knocking it down but building a better shaped (square) warm roof conservatory from scratch that way I can be sure it's got enough insulation everywhere, I just don't have the money for a proper extension sadly, and the kitchen would propably be really dark if there were too many walls anyway. I will have to get someone in to have a proper look.

I'm not planning on moving for at least 20 years this is our forever family home until retirement. But thanks again for advice
 
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Floor type-stamp about on it. If it sounds hollow and moves a bit you have suspended timber. If it sounds solid then you have concrete (solid or block & beam, doesn't matter, airbricks not needed)
 
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Floor type-stamp about on it. If it sounds hollow and moves a bit you have suspended timber. If it sounds solid then you have concrete (solid or block & beam, doesn't matter, airbricks not needed)
Dunno why that went up twice- if anyone wants to delete this du licate feel free
 
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I'm not planning on moving for at least 20 years this is our forever family home until retirement.
I'd do what my budget allows and stuff reg's in that case. All I'd recommend is spend your money wisely on things that are likely to increase your comfort rather than throwing it at those who can promise much but deliver little. There is no miracle glass or ultra thin miracle insulation. You will need to reduce the glazing and deal with the roof insulation/ventilation detail robustly. The floor being lower is a bonus and will accommodate both insulation and screed or a floating floor if you wish.
The raised door I could live with as long as I can sunbathe in the other direction.:whistle:
 
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