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Re-finishing damaged MDF cupboard front

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by HawkEye244, 19 Aug 2021.

  1. HawkEye244

    HawkEye244

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    Hi all,
    I'm touching up some laminated MDF cupboard fronts and would like to repair the water damage (as per photo.)

    I've applied some leyland acrylic but obviously any moisture is being re-soaked up by the MDF causing it to rise. I have repeatedly painted and sanded this area but not achieved a nice base finish.

    Does anyone have a really good solution to this problem that doesn't not involve me going out and buying a tin of MDF sealer? I almost never deal with MDF (this is the first time in 10 years) and will be unlikely do so again, so buying a whole tin of something I'm likely never going to use is the least desired option. I do have PVA to hand. Many thanks for any information.

    IMG_20210819_090453401.jpg
    IMG_20210819_090504666.jpg
    IMG_20210819_090447760.jpg
     
  2. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    Do you have an oil-based undercoat/primer? That will seal the MDF with minimal grain rise
     
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  4. HawkEye244

    HawkEye244

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    Thanks, I will look and see.
    Will a gloss paint of any description serve the same purpose?
     
  5. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    It would, maybe, but the problem then is that you'll need to abrade the surface to get some sort of mechanical bond between the sealing coat and whatever you use as the final finish. It will also take a long time to set fully before you abrade it. Personally, I wouldn't go down this track. You'd be better off with a can of car touch up undercoat
     
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