Reading the label, and find you don't want it.

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In the local trinket shop, there is a returns basket, not sure what happens to items in the basket, but if you pick up a book, read the review and decide you don't want it, it is not returned to shelves directly, likely simply quarinteened for set time and returned to shelf.

But with the supermarket there seems no such system, without picking up a tin and rotating it you can't read the ingredients, so with your regular brand great, but as soon as any shortages you have to read contents, be it religious or health many people avoid things.

So if Brikabrac needs removing from shelf why not food?
 
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In the local trinket shop, there is a returns basket, not sure what happens to items in the basket, but if you pick up a book, read the review and decide you don't want it, it is not returned to shelves directly, likely simply quarinteened for set time and returned to shelf.

But with the supermarket there seems no such system, without picking up a tin and rotating it you can't read the ingredients, so with your regular brand great, but as soon as any shortages you have to read contents, be it religious or health many people avoid things.

So if Brikabrac needs removing from shelf why not food?
Needs Vs practically.

It'd be difficult to impossible to do that in a supermarket, volume of traffic and sorting time would be epic. Whilst in a trinket shop you might have more than one customer in an hour.

So, in the trinket shop it's possible to take more time quarantining or sanitising products, which reduces risk of transmission and makes customers feel more secure. So they choose to do so.

In short it's a way to reduce the total risk of spread, some infinitesimal fraction of the current R rate. Every time you can shave a tiny bit off that value it helps, so you shave where you can as well as where you can shave the most off.
 
Since Kung Flu, I'm careful to pick goods from the back of the supermarket shelf and underneath if I can. Don't want goods from the top/front of shelf where everyone's been pawing them and coughing their germs.

Also, I always said I would be the last person using cash, driving a petrol/diesel vehicle and using a dumb phone. The last two are still true, but had to revise my view on cash due to virus. Cash is dirty and an ideal way to spread Corona. Most of my shop purchases are now by card. If I use cash (rare), any change is left in a jar at home for 2 weeks.
 
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Sainsbury's have a 72 hour segregation period for returned clothing. Don't know about any other of their products.
 
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The last two are still true, but had to revise my view on cash due to virus. Cash is dirty and an ideal way to spread Corona. Most of my shop purchases are now by card.
I used cash the other night for the first time in a long, long while. I popped up the offie to buy a couple of Crunchies for me and Mrs Mottie. I only had my phone with me with contactless payment on it. I use it all the time, even for very small purchases in the Co-op. They wouldn’t take card payment for anything less than a fiver. I didn’t want anything else so I had to dash back outside to the car and get my parking pot of uncontaminated loose change to pay for 'em - the correct money too, I did’t want to handle any change!
 
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A report on BBC web site seems to say just 2 hours is enough in most cases, although lab tests have show the virus to survive the concentration was many times higher than would be found in real live. However the government it seems has laid out rules for some shops and leisure things to open and the quarantine rules are required by government.

I can see how it would be a problem for some food stuff, but supermarkets don't only sell food, so non food in supermarket should have same rules as everywhere else.

In the main travel is the problem, and I can see a local supermarket is likely to be frequented by locals, where the Heritage railway is likely to how people who have travelled many miles to visit it, so yes can see some reasons for tighter controls in shops corrected to tourism to those mainly serving local communities, but any town or village which has a tourist attraction will have tourists in all shops.

I remember living in Hong Kong, where the supermarket shelves had voids in the middle so the super market worker would replenish the shelf from the back, so I picked up a can of drink, when to change my mind and replace it but couldn't as already replaced from back. No pallets of stuff in the isles there, shoppers and shop workers never met except at the till.

Shelve labels would help, my daughter will not eat animal gelatin, so see reads the labels, but it would be easy to label as to which religious and other groups each food is suitable for. Vegetarian, Vegan, Jewish, Muslim etc. saving the need for those people to read the label on the can.
 
If the shoppers are wearing facemasks, they are less likely to rub their contaminated hands on their lips and noses.

Equally the shoppers who previously handled the cans will have been less snotty.


It all helps.
 
If the shoppers are wearing facemasks, they are less likely to rub their contaminated hands on their lips and noses.

Equally the shoppers who previously handled the cans will have been less snotty.


It all helps.
maskers are more likely to be handling their faces and noses . forever shifting them up and down their faces , scratching their itches. even pulling them below their mouth to speak.
pointless!
 
In the local trinket shop, there is a returns basket, not sure what happens to items in the basket, but if you pick up a book, read the review and decide you don't want it, it is not returned to shelves directly, likely simply quarinteened for set time and returned to shelf.

But with the supermarket there seems no such system, without picking up a tin and rotating it you can't read the ingredients, so with your regular brand great, but as soon as any shortages you have to read contents, be it religious or health many people avoid things.

So if Brikabrac needs removing from shelf why not food?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/explainers-53783890
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/explainers-53783890
Bit on the beeb this morning about food packaging :)


maskers are more likely to be handling their faces and noses . forever shifting them up and down their faces , scratching their itches. even pulling them below their mouth to speak.
pointless!
Some are numpties for sure, but there's a lot more people out there who are considerate :)


I used cash the other night for the first time in a long, long while.!
Yep, still got the same £15 in my purse from when this all started!
 
maskers are more likely to be handling their faces and noses . forever shifting them up and down their faces , scratching their itches. even pulling them below their mouth to speak.
pointless!
An interesting hypothesis, unsupported by any evidence.

Benny is feeling whimsical today.
 
Some are numpties for sure, but there's a lot more people out there who are considerate

It's not lack of consideration, it's lack of understanding.
Even that berk Dr Hillary (who should know better) was saying that face coverings are more effective than social distance, and even being outdoors!

As I have posted a number of times, we stopped overwhelming the health service through social distance and sanitising ; ignoring that "because I've got me mask on" (often incorrectly, but hey ho) is a backward step.
 
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