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Ream after using automatic pipe cutter?

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by nebjamin, 6 Apr 2017.

  1. nebjamin

    nebjamin

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    Hi all

    I have a Rothernberger 15mm automatic pipe cutter (one of the ones you clip on and twist). However I noticed that the cut ends of the pipe are very slightly turned inwards (as though the pressure of the cutting wheel has compressed the ends in a bit).

    Is it standard practice to use a reamer or other tool to open the ends out to full bore (we're talking sub-mm adjustments here, but I like to do things properly)? Or just don't bother?

    My cutter is a few years old but it's only ever had light DIY use.

    Thanks
    Ben
     
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  3. Agile

    Agile

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    For most purposes it is going to be pretty irrelevant.

    But for gas use if the pipe length/sizes is on the limit than many will pay attention to minute details to ensure that it performs to the maximum possible.

    But a DIYer with time on is hands can afford to ream it !

    Tony
     
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  4. nebjamin

    nebjamin

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    It's just for water. Thinking about reduction of noise etc. As you said, maybe I'm being overly fussy.
     
  5. Happyplumber

    Happyplumber

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    If you want to do it properly then yes ream out every pipe,unfortunately I can't put my hand on my heart and say I do every single piece
     
    Last edited: 6 Apr 2017
  6. footprints

    footprints

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    Yup! :whistle:(y)
     
  7. leakydave

    leakydave

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    ... way over fussy
     
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  8. muggles

    muggles

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    What's a reamer? :whistle:
     
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  9. ianmcd

    ianmcd

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    only time I have ever done it is if using a bending spring, it wont fit in unless you ream the pipe after using a pipe slice
     
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  11. 45yearsagasman

    45yearsagasman

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    Was always taught to ream the cut. Always do, even now. I wonder by how much a blunt cutter reduces the internal bore of the pipe?
     
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  12. ianmcd

    ianmcd

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    Pete I have always been of the opinion that if you use a compression fitting then the "stop" inside the fitting will be a bigger restriction than anything that the pipe slice or wheel cutters will cause, never had any problems, but to be honest never installed anything that would be that critical
     
  13. Agile

    Agile

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    It is usually only on 22 mm or larger with gas that reaming seems to look like a good idea.

    I have to say that I do it on most 22 gas pipes that I cut with a pipeslice.

    I think that if you put a bit of WD40 on the tube before cutting it reduces the amount it digs in.

    But I don't do it with a proper reamer but use either a Stanley knife to cut a little scrape off the inside of the copper tube or a jaw of an adjustable spanner.
     
  14. DP

    DP

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    If a job needs doing, it needs doing well
    For water, rarely ream the tube
    For gas lines have a proper reamer as well as a stepped cone cutter that makes life easier
    Reasort to using a box cutter or WD40? Not in a million years.

    But then again, almost all my work is boiler repair, just a smidging of installations
     
  15. nebjamin

    nebjamin

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    Thanks everyone for the replies. As someone said, DIYer with plenty of time and only a few (soldered) joints to make.
     
  16. JayJay1978

    JayJay1978

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    Leaving it burred adds to the frictional resistance of the pipework, as Agile says. Of course burr if you have time.
     
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