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Relaying tiles, with french drain.

Discussion in 'In the Garden' started by Zezu, 12 Jul 2020.

  1. Zezu

    Zezu

    Joined:
    12 Jul 2020
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    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hello, our garden is a bit messy and we have these Y shaped metal frames for securing bikes too, that are rusted up and just full of water.

    So I wanted to lift up all the slabs, put some better frames in and put a good base under the slabs (they were dot and dabbed by previous owner) with rubble, stones and sand, and mortar the slabs in. I've done this already with the other end of the garden a year a go and it's been good and solid. We can have bbq's, tables and chairs out there with no issues, so I think my technique is ok.

    My only concern is that we have a french drain in front of the house, and I don't want to mess that up and damage the property, or have water drain under the slabs, washing away the base I put in and the patio collapsing.

    Just looking for some tips and notes on the subject, hopefully from people more experienced than I.

    Here is the french drain.

    IMG_20200712_151733.jpg

    Here is the Y shaped bike lock. I've found some nicer ones for not to much.
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Hardcastle...9Y2xpY2tSZWRpcmVjdCZkb05vdExvZ0NsaWNrPXRydWU=

    IMG_20200712_151824.jpg
     
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  3. PropRepairAdvice

    PropRepairAdvice

    Joined:
    16 Jul 2020
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    Country:
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    If this is a French drain it should have a perforated pipe within the gravel and connected to the underground drainage.

    If it’s not, remove the chillings, dig a channel, insert the pipe, connect to the gully, you may need a new one to connect up your pipe, replace chippings ensuring they do not breach your external wall damp product course. Ideally your ground/paving levels should be 6” below your dpc to stop rising dampness. Then lay your paving at that height.
     
  4. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

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