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Removing Block Paving for a Hedge

Discussion in 'In the Garden' started by Deryck Tintagel, 25 May 2020.

  1. Deryck Tintagel

    Deryck Tintagel

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    At the front on my house is an area of block paving leading up to a border with trees and shrubs that belongs to the neighbour - the houses are at right angles - and then their tarmac drive. The border is the view from the front window.

    Nothing has been said to me recently but I have the feeling that they may remove the border to extend their drive a bit. As we do not look out straight onto their cars it is not too bad at the moment. However, I am planning ahead just in case!

    If I remove some of the block paving, how wide would be a recommended width for a new hedge? And are there any suggestions for a dense evergreen hedge that is quite quick to establish and grow?

    I am not sure what is below the blocks apart from the usual sand bed but I know that it was put down be the developer when the house was built so there could be quite some sub-base!

    Comments and suggestions are welcome
     
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  3. conny

    conny

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    Pictures would help to determine exactly what you are thinking of doing.

    You will need to consider who's property the paving blocks are on before removing them. If it is your own house and they are on your land then you can do what you want with them. However, if they straddle the boundary line then you neighbour may have some rights over them as well.

    Be very careful when selecting your replacement hedging. We have a small one running down the side of the drive which, when we moved in nearly 5 years ago, (rented property so can only do limited work to it), was quite slim. Don't know what it's called but it's very soft to run your hands over and despite trying to keep it slim with a hedge cutter it has ballooned out from the base upwards and is now at least 3 times the original thickness. If it had been planted onto the pavement edge of the garden pedestrians would now need to walk into the road to get around it.
     
  4. Deryck Tintagel

    Deryck Tintagel

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    The block paving is entirely mine so I can do as I like in that regard. It would narrow the access a little but it is what you get used to. As you see the existing planting is to the left. I wondered if box hedging might be good? Looking at the existing drive possibly 300mm could be taken for the hedge.

    The alternative would be a nice quality fence, but that is not so nice to look out onto
     

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  5. conny

    conny

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    I honestly don't know what types of hedges there are, (I'm in rented property and the hedge I mentioned was already here so no idea what it is called), but I know they need constant maintenance to prevent them getting out of hand.
    You could put a 'nice' fence up and then plant some climbers at the base in a 300mm flower bed. One advantage of this is you can change the plants easily if you don't like them.
     
  6. Deryck Tintagel

    Deryck Tintagel

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    A fence could be the easier option as I am not sure what sub-base I would find under the blocks and this could a lot of digging. I was considering a fence with planters or as suggested a 300mm bed in pockets - just a few along the length
     
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  8. dal5band

    dal5band

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    The best solution would be if your neighbour planted the hedge in half of the existing border. That way they would gain a liitle bit more drive and keep both your privecy. After all they are disturbing the status quo.
     
  9. dal5band

    dal5band

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    By the way , where exactly is the border ? It may be half way downthe planted border ?
     
  10. Deryck Tintagel

    Deryck Tintagel

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    Unfortunately, the property boundary is the edge of the blocks - I double checked the deeds
     
  11. conny

    conny

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    So you have no right to interfer in the existing border. However, it doesn't stop you from lifting your blocks and building a fence or, another alternative, asking your neighbour for permission to sink a few fence posts into the existing border to erect your fence.
     
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