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Repair to garden gate

Discussion in 'Decorating and Painting' started by Jeremy2014, 20 Sep 2020.

  1. Jeremy2014

    Jeremy2014

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    Hi to all DIY expert

    We had / believe that we had a hit and run on our garden gate.

    Don’t think it is worth to spend time to find out who done it.


    But pretty annoyed as we did repainted earlier this year.


    Sadly, we going to need to repair it and repaint it so to maintain its outlook and prevent any further damage to the exposed woods.


    White side bit – some wood filler –

    Have some left over from earlier this spring

    https://www.toolstation.com/everbuild-high-performance-wood-filler-500g/p16873

    will make sure that I only put couple of drop of the additional part as it is so painful then to sand.

    Sanding and then undercoat and then gloss again.


    Question is more about the split slate.

    Is there a way to fix it back to the main slate by maybe using some panel pins? Just need to find some small one that won’t split the wood further

    What about some glue as well?

    Many thanks
     

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  3. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    The white upright looks like it could be a timber capping - that is, not part of the main gate frame.....see if it wants to prise loose with a chisel, prior to fixing a new length on.
    The blue door panel is a weatherboard type of timber which overlaps....not conventional but that needs ideally to be replaced.
    John :)
     
  4. sparkwright

    sparkwright

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    If you do use panel pins, drill the wood using a tiny drill bit to minimise splitting.
     
  5. Tigercubrider

    Tigercubrider

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    Or tap the pin on the sharp end first, head against the brickwork or concrete
     
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  7. opps

    opps

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    Why would that help? If the concern is that the nail will potentially split the wood, wouldn't a blunt nail split the wood as well.

    For what it is worth, it makes sense to pre-drill holes when drilling, even if there is no risk of splitting the timber. When a nail enters timber it forces the grain apart, imagine a round wire nail creating an eye shaped hole as it is hammered in. Pre-drilling reduces the eye shaping profile and results in a tighter and stronger fitting. The same is true of using screws, that said, some screws claim to have the ability to pilot as they screw in. I still drill a pilot, especially in hardwood (I have experienced too many screws snap as I either try to release or screw them in).
     
  8. Tigercubrider

    Tigercubrider

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    Apparently it works because a sharp nail forces the wood fibres apart, so the wood splits.
    A dull nail cuts through the fibres, the wood doesn't split
    Weird but works
     
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  9. opps

    opps

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    You might be correct but I don't understand the logic behind it. That said, there are many things I don't understand. My gut instinct is that it is bad science, but, yeah, I could be wrong, tnx.
     
  10. Jeremy2014

    Jeremy2014

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    Thanks everybody for your input! as soon as weather is better will try the advice given! :)
     
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