1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

Replacement extractor fan with timer

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by blup, 25 Mar 2018.

  1. blup

    blup

    Joined:
    5 Nov 2007
    Messages:
    1,573
    Thanks Received:
    271
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Good evening,

    Is it notifiable work to replace an existing extractor fan with timer, for the same but with a built in pull cord to isolate the fan. Both would continue to be operated by a light switch, all in a shower room. There is no existing isolator, installation took place in 2004.

    So essentially the only electrical work would be in changing over the fan.

    The proposed make is an Xpelair dx100

    Cheers

    Blup
     
  2. Sponsored Links
  3. flameport

    flameport

    Joined:
    10 Mar 2007
    Messages:
    9,554
    Thanks Received:
    1,887
    Location:
    Poole, Dorset
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Not notifiable.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  4. JBR

    JBR

    Joined:
    9 Jan 2007
    Messages:
    8,929
    Thanks Received:
    391
    Location:
    Cheshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I'm pretty sure it's not notifiable. I didn't notify anyone when I changed mine, anyway!

    Assuming the existing installation is OK, replacing it is pretty straightforward. I managed quite easily and I'm not a qualified electrician.

    If it's of any help, I bought one of these, which I found to be very effective and also very quiet:
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0080XNKQ0/ref=pe_3187911_189395841_TE_dp_1

    Incidentally, the same model is also available with a pull cord switch.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  5. JohnD

    JohnD

    Joined:
    15 Nov 2005
    Messages:
    71,876
    Thanks Received:
    4,092
    Location:
    Crossgates
    Country:
    Cook Islands
    OOI, your proposed fan has a noise rating of 35db

    One of the reasons some people grumble about extractors is that they can hear them, so they often turn them off, leading to mouldy bathrooms. Some more modern extractors are about 25db which is noticeably quieter. For example https://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Products/SLSD100CZ.html
    and JBR's suggestion which is equally quiet.

    Might be worth looking into if you have not bought it yet.

    I think the DX100 does not have an overrun timer enabling it to carry on drying out the room after you leave. Again, people often object to these if they have a noisy old fan.
     
  6. blup

    blup

    Joined:
    5 Nov 2007
    Messages:
    1,573
    Thanks Received:
    271
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks, I'd missed that the Xpelair model with the pull chord didn't have an overrun timer which is what, ideally, I want. There is a version with a humidstat but other posts on this site suggest they're not efficient or effective.

    I could install a three pole pull cord isolator switch within the shower room, but have assumed that this would be notifiable work as there is none at present.

    Is there on the market a quiet, reasonably priced, replacement 4" wall mounted fan extractor, with built in pull cord and adjustable timer?

    Cheers

    Blup
     
  7. JohnD

    JohnD

    Joined:
    15 Nov 2005
    Messages:
    71,876
    Thanks Received:
    4,092
    Location:
    Crossgates
    Country:
    Cook Islands
    not that I've noticed

    what's the reason you want to turn it off with a pull cord?
     
  8. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

    Joined:
    27 Aug 2003
    Messages:
    69,783
    Thanks Received:
    2,858
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Maybe he doesn't want it to come on every time the light is turned on.
     
  9. JohnD

    JohnD

    Joined:
    15 Nov 2005
    Messages:
    71,876
    Thanks Received:
    4,092
    Location:
    Crossgates
    Country:
    Cook Islands
    and maybe not.

    I could have made guesses as well, but the OP is the one to ask.
     
  10. Sponsored Links
  11. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

    Joined:
    27 Aug 2003
    Messages:
    69,783
    Thanks Received:
    2,858
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Indeed. But it is a reasonable guess, TBH I can't think of a more likely reason.
     
  12. JohnW2

    JohnW2

    Joined:
    28 Jan 2011
    Messages:
    47,637
    Thanks Received:
    3,100
    Location:
    Buckinghamshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    If you wanted to go down that route (which I wouldn't necessarily advocate), and if you're talking about a ceiling-mounted pull switch, and if you're in England (rather than Wales), then it would not be notifiable work if the ceiling were more than 2.25m above 'finished floor level'.

    Kind Regards, John
     
  13. blup

    blup

    Joined:
    5 Nov 2007
    Messages:
    1,573
    Thanks Received:
    271
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    JW2 - the ceiling height is a tad under 2.5 metres.

    Does it make any difference that the circuit is not RCD protected? The CU uses MCB's.

    And is it relevant that the fan is located within 300mm of the edge of the shower door, but not above any part of it?

    A switched fan (which otherwise operates on a timed overrun) that can be independently turned off will reduce noise, particularly at night (there is a toilet in the same room).

    Cheers

    Blup
     
  14. JohnW2

    JohnW2

    Joined:
    28 Jan 2011
    Messages:
    47,637
    Thanks Received:
    3,100
    Location:
    Buckinghamshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    In that case, electrical work at ceiling height would not be notifiable (in England).
    Yes, a big difference. All circuits supplying a bathroom are now required to be RCD protected. Although that regulation is not retrospective (i.e. one is not required to bring existing circuits up-to-date), adding something to the circyuit (like the pull switch) would probably invoke the requirement for it to be RCD protected. Merely replacing an existing fan wouldn't.
    No, as far as notifiability is concerned, if it's more than 2.25m above floor level, it is not notifiable, regardless of what it is 'over'.

    Kind Regards, John
     
  15. blup

    blup

    Joined:
    5 Nov 2007
    Messages:
    1,573
    Thanks Received:
    271
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    JW2 - thanks.

    Just to be clear, installing an isolator switch - which in my case means breaking into the existing lighting circuit cable (no new cable needed because of the proximity of the fan and the location of the proposed switch) and connecting up the 3 core and earth switch, in line so to speak between the fan and the ceiling rose, is deemed to be a new circuit under the regulations?

    Cheers

    Blup
     
  16. JohnW2

    JohnW2

    Joined:
    28 Jan 2011
    Messages:
    47,637
    Thanks Received:
    3,100
    Location:
    Buckinghamshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Not a 'new circuit', as such, but I suspect that many would say that adding anything new (even if only a switch/isolator) to an existing circuit supplying a bathroom would invoke the current requirement for the circuit to be RCD-protected (and, if so, that would apply even if the added switch/isolator was physically outside of the bathroom).

    Kind Regards, John
     
  17. JohnD

    JohnD

    Joined:
    15 Nov 2005
    Messages:
    71,876
    Thanks Received:
    4,092
    Location:
    Crossgates
    Country:
    Cook Islands
    just as I suspected

    in which case, one of the modern new ball-bearing fans will be almost imperceptible. Add a door and you won't know it's on.
     
Loading...

Share This Page