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Replacing an electric oven

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by jrussuk, 22 Jul 2015.

  1. jrussuk

    jrussuk

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    I'm buying a new electric oven and was wondering if I need to get an electrician in to install it or can I do it myself.
    The old oven has its own trip fuse and I'm very competent with replacing like for like electrical items but didn't know if there are any regs for doing this.

    Many Thanks
     
  2. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    There are no regulations to say that you cannot do anything.

    However you should do the same as an electrician and test the circuit to ensure it is safe.
    It is doubtful that you will have the necessary equipment so you will not know if it is safe, so...

    Is the oven 'like for like' (I hate that phrase) or is it larger?
     
  3. jj4091

    jj4091

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    If it is definitely like for like & was installed properly in the first place then there is no reason why you should not do it.
     
  4. jrussuk

    jrussuk

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    Thanks for the reply. The old oven is about 8/9 years old. We bought the house from an electrician who done the house up at about the same time so the electrics are pretty modern. The new oven is going to be the same but I will check the wattage and amperage against the old oven
     
  5. ericmark

    ericmark

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    As electricians we have to inspect and test everything we do and raise paperwork to show what we have done. It is unlikely any DIY person can do the same. That does not mean DIY work is dangerous or illegal, but it does mean it's a lottery as to if it's safe or compliant.

    Law and regulations are not the same.
     
  6. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    It may be a good opportunity to do tests on the circuit, but do the regs require it when just replacing an appliance?
     
  7. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    I shall assume from your question that the answer is "No".

    However, I would be most uneasy connecting an oven (for a customer) without testing the circuit and recording the results.


    I fail to see how the owner of the oven would not want to know the same.
     
  8. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    I suppose the answer to that depends upon whether or not a minor works cert is required for "just replacing an appliance" - and I'm not sure of the answer to that - are you? If an MWC is required, then that calls for most of the usual tests (including IR, Zs and, if there is one, RCD tests)

    Kind Regards, John
     
  9. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    Why would they not want to know the same every time they plug an appliance into a socket?
     
  10. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    I would imagine that most people would fee the same - but it does beg the question as to where one 'draws the line' as far as 'replacements' are concerned - e.g. light bulb/lamp? lamp holder? whole light fitting? ... immersion heater?

    The other interesting question is what if it were just a plug-in oven? Would it then be necessary to test the circuit? If not, why not, if tests would be required for a hard-wired one (I see little electrical difference)? ... and if you feel testing of the circuit would be required, what other appliances that a person bought and plugged into a socket do you think would call for the circuit to be tested?

    Edit: damnit - typed too slowly again :)

    Kind Regards, John
     
  11. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    It is not required.

    And you've recently been quite big on "what's the difference between....", so maybe you can explain what the difference is between putting a plug onto an oven and plugging it into an existing socket, and wiring the same cable to the load terminals of an FCU on the same circuit, and containing the same local protective device as the plug.

    Edit: damnit - typed too slowly again :)
     
  12. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    Whether it is a requirement or not, a minimum of a Zs check takes so little time to give a fair indication of the circuit.

    If it were discovered soon after the work that there was no earth connection, I think the customer would be justified in thinking you had been less than satisfactory.
    Changing a light bulb may be taking it too far but the others, why not?
     
  13. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    So should people check Zs at each socket every time they go to plug something in?
     
  14. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    I can well believe that - as I said, I wasn't sure. For future reference, where can I find a statement in BS7671 as to what work does, and does not, require an MWC?

    Kind Regards, John
     
  15. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    No, but if fitting a new socket, I would/they should - plus the other tests.

    No need to check it again to make me tea.
     
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