Replacing floor by Sliding door

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I’ve got an issue. I’ve just had my lounge plastered.

I want to sand and lacquer the floor. I can’t find the same T&G floor boards anywhere! I’ve tried reclamation centres, and the usual timber merchants.

... Anyways... I’ve bought some Red Pine boards that are the same thickness and I’ll trim the width to match.

I have an area next to the sliding doors that the wall plate has rotten away. How do I secure a wall plate / bracket of some kind to fix the floor down to as there’s no wall plate (if that’s the correct thing)

Here’s some pics ...
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Just replace the rotten piece with one the same thickness and fix down to the brick

You also need to find out why the piece of timber rotted in the first place
 
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You want to slow down mate. just read your early posts that its a first house and your first DIY effort.
Your maybe leaping about without any job schedule.
Can you post pics showing the door bottom rail and ground level from outside? and pics showing the inside as it is now - the pics above seem dated.
 
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Air brick seems to below outside levels? which allows in rain and rots the timbers.
 
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I will bet that originally, your house had French windows with a short wall and windows on either side. Look at similar houses in your street.
My house had similar, the PO replaced the French doors with a wide aluminium patio door. I replaced that myself with a wooden one when it had issues. My house has parquet over concrete from new

On my house, either side of the original walkway through the French doors was infilled (badly) with concrete
I dug the whole lot up, used some salvage parquet and filled the whole width across to look deliberate

It looks as if you might be able to do the same, but fit a metal strap across? Or fit a timber piece?
You could screw sideways into the brick pillars and fashion metal angle brackets that have slots so they drop over the screws (bolts) then fix timber to the top? I am no builder but also maybe protect the airbrick with some kind of duct and pour concrete to bring it up level with the brickwork- you'd need a dpm of sorts

I'm a believer in "if you can't hide it- make it a feature" so replacing a strip the entire length is an option . Possibly contrast the wood ?
 
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I will bet that originally, your house had French windows with a short wall and windows on either side. Look at similar houses in your street.
My house had similar, the PO replaced the French doors with a wide aluminium patio door. I replaced that myself with a wooden one when it had issues. My house has parquet over concrete from new

On my house, either side of the original walkway through the French doors was infilled (badly) with concrete
I dug the whole lot up, used some salvage parquet and filled the whole width across to look deliberate

It looks as if you might be able to do the same, but fit a metal strap across? Or fit a timber piece?
You could screw sideways into the brick pillars and fashion metal angle brackets that have slots so they drop over the screws (bolts) then fix timber to the top? I am no builder but also maybe protect the airbrick with some kind of duct and pour concrete to bring it up level with the brickwork- you'd need a dpm of sorts

I'm a believer in "if you can't hide it- make it a feature" so replacing a strip the entire length is an option . Possibly contrast the wood ?

You read my mind with the contrasting bit.

the air bricks are within the DPM bricks. There’s a 3 foot crawl space underneath the floor. So I was thinking of just sticking a piece of timber against the wall side. But a bracket might be good for some reinforcement.
 
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YOWyHix.jpg


Here’s the front view..

forgive the news paper, just had the room plastered and the sun beams in in the room a little too hot, so put them up whilst it dries.
 
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That looks quite like the old door that broke on mine, although you seem to have a set of high level windows as well?
 
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Go to a timber merchants with a piece of floor board for matching up.
You need to make a new cut line over the joist, use a circular saw.
A bearer could be fixed across screwed into the bricks.

How rotten is the plate below the door? Maybe the rot can be gouged out and the wood treated?
Moisture could be penetrating from below the frame or from the left hand bottom corner of the frame? Or even rising up from below the bridged engineering bricks? Any wood should have been wrapped in DPC material - any new wood will need to be set on a DPC.

The slider panels have been fixed the wrong way round - the moving door is usually on the inside, the fixed panel on the outside. Sliders are easy to break into but that slider could be opened in 30 secs.
How the windows above are supported isn't clear - how high is the room?
Is the copper pipe a gas pipe?
 
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Thanks for the reply.
Interesting to note the doors are done bloody backwards :rolleyes:

I’ll include some more pics to show what I’m dealing with on the right hand side.

I was thinking of building a small brick wall just wear there was an attempt of one here to give the mid part more support?
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Try not to sit any wood onto of bricks that have no DPC.
The bricks will wick up moisture onto your new wood.

Buy a roll of DPC and put this on top of any brickwork before you sit your joists etc on it.
 
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Looking at the new pics it might be best for you to pull the whole patio door and expose whats going on behind the jambs and below the bottom rail. But first be certain that the alu frame isn't supporting the windows above?
It looks like the frame bottom rail was installed on the old wood sill - there's no alu sill.
The frame jambs are pinned to the old wood frame jambs.
Both wood sill and side jambs look like they are rotting.
Maybe there's no bottom rail working drainage method at the moment - you need clear channels for drainage.

On the right hand below the floor you show wispy looking strands that could be cobwebs or some kind of wood rot? What are they?
There's no trickle vents in the frame head.But there's a high 9" x 3" air brick on the wall.
Could you show outside where your rubbish bags are stacked - is there a gulley near there and what is that cu pipe and where does it go to?
 
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Ok I think it’s fixed haha. I’ve treated a lot of the wood with some rot stuff.
We used a long block of timber and glued/screwed it into the brick below and cut some boards down to size and also staggered the boards so it didn’t look too odd.
It feels more secure than a lot of the other boards so hopefully it’ll hold out for a good while.
I’m hoping I can get the stain the same colour! Fingers crossed!!!
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Looks good. Once the whole floor is sanded you may be able to treat individual boards slightly differently if the colour still isn't matching
 
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