Replacing Victorian front door

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Hi there

I need to replace a fairly basic wooden Victorian front door as well as the threshold, prefearbly on a budget.
The quotes we've had for a new one has been quite high and so I've been thinking
about buying a reclaimed one, put double glazing in and get someone to fit it.

I was wondering if anyone has done this and whether there
are any potential pitfalls I should be aware of or any tips to make it as easy as possible?

Thanks
 
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The biggest issue is matching the size. You don't want to have to trim more than a few millimetres off the width (to keep the lock mortises and keyholes in the right places as well as to ensure that you retain the structural integrity of the wedged mortise and tenon joints) and you also don't want to fave to trim more than about 5mm off the top and 10mm off the bottom of the door, mainly because the frame element start to look out of balance and just plain wrong on over trimmed doors. Aesthetics, I know, but I feel it matters
 
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The biggest issue is matching the size. You don't want to have to trim more than a few millimetres off the width (to keep the lock mortises and keyholes in the right places as well as to ensure that you retain the structural integrity of the wedged mortise and tenon joints) and you also don't want to fave to trim more than about 5mm off the top and 10mm off the bottom of the door, mainly because the frame element start to look out of balance and just plain wrong on over trimmed doors. Aesthetics, I know, but I feel it matters
O.k thanks. I was thinking of buying a door slightly bigger and then hopefully get the fitter to cut it to size.
 
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What is so “unfixable” on the original?
It could potentially be fixed but I've been a bit worried about security as it has a large window which covers a large part of top half of door. Even with toughened glass I am wondering if it could be a problem.
 
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If it really is old, then you will pay a lot of money to get anything any where near the same quality. If you are worried about glass security, add some additional glass. It's the lock that is important.
 
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If it really is old, then you will pay a lot of money to get anything any where near the same quality. If you are worried about glass security, add some additional glass. It's the lock that is important.

Couldn't someone smash the window and crawl through it? I like what you're saying though as it would make my life a whole lot easier:)
 
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O.k thanks. I was thinking of buying a door slightly bigger and then hopefully get the fitter to cut it to size.
Yes that's the right way to go, but I was just trying to point out that there are limits on how much bigger you can go and still get a door which retains its' strength, doesn't require a lot of make-good work to get a mortise lock in and which looks right. I've seen a lot of doors over the years which have suffered grievously because someone has chopped off far too much material (sorry, but I am trade and I happen to like working on listed buildings...)
 
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Yes that's the right way to go, but I was justvtrying to point out that tgere are limits on how much bigger you can go and still get a door which retsins its' strength, doesn't require a lot of maje-good work to get a mortise lock in and which looks right. I've seen a lot of doors over the years which have suffered grievously because someone has chopped off far too much material (sorry, but I am trade and I happen to like working on listed buildings...)
Great advice. Thanks(y)
 
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If the door has ornate glass in a panel that might be a security issue you can fit a laminated glass sheet behind the door or fit decorative bars behind it.
it could We’ll be that the door is better replaced but original features matter

decent locks on a door help. I have a Yale type plus mortise and have hinge side pins that locate in the frame.
 
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If the door has ornate glass in a panel that might be a security issue you can fit a laminated glass sheet behind the door or fit decorative bars behind it.
it could We’ll be that the door is better replaced but original features matter

decent locks on a door help. I have a Yale type plus mortise and have hinge side pins that locate in the frame.

The door does have ornate glass which looks great but it's not exactly high security so there are a few things to consider.
 
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Burglar Bill told me when breaking into a house:
Chose the back of the house if poss'
Jemmy a window open
Try the back door
Kick-in a uPVC panel if available
Break a window/glass panel, but the noise of breaking glass attracts attention
Climbing thr' broken glass could cut and will leave DNA traces
At night unlit access is best...

If your door is the front door - this will be low risk
 
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I've decided to stick with our original door as it's in very good condition. Already stripped the paint.
A couple of questions:

- There's quite a large gap (10cm all the way up) between door frame and wall which needs insulated. Is it best to use expanding foam or fibreglass insulation material?

- The original glass looks great and as suggested above I was thinking of adding a piece of laminated glass. A friend will fit the glass and he suggested using silicone but I am a little concerned about moisture. Any suggestions what's best, glazing tape, silicone or both?

Thanks
 

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