Resin Treatment for Subsidence

Discussion in 'Building' started by garash, 9 Aug 2020.

  1. garash

    garash

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    Has anyone used this method for subsidence? I would be interested to hear your comments
     
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  3. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    We looked at it once. There were so many caveats, and get outs, and reasons why it may not work, plus potential leaks into drains, that it was just high risk with no guarantee of it working.

    Add in the cost, it was no cheaper than traditional remedies.
     
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  4. garash

    garash

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  5. garash

    garash

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    Thank you so much
     
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  7. Notch7

    Notch7

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    I've seen a job that had foam injection for subsidence. It was a huge 8 bed house which had dropped in the rear middle by 6 inches including a main spine wall.

    These foam systems are powerful enough to raise a house up again, they have to be careful not to overdo it.

    The property developer has used the method a few times. He buys houses that have had subsidence and can't get a mortgage, gets the founds sorted then refurbished and sells.

    It's certainly worth looking at, but the suitability does depend on individual circumstances. It's not a magic solution.

    If the solution is a bit of underpinning, it's not that complex. Underpinning can simply mean dig a metre cube out, fill with concrete and dry pack. Then dig next section, so on. For a long wall it's possible to do mit and miss sections. It's A common solution for Victorian properties built on a spread footing maybe just on a bit of clinker.
     
  8. garash

    garash

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  9. Ian H

    Ian H

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    I was on a job where they did it too. I had to replace all internal drainage in case what they called ‘grout’ got in on a joint.
     
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  10. garash

    garash

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    The property is a one bed Bungalow 90 years old and on shallow footings. Forarmed is Forwarned as they say so
     
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    If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

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