Rising damp quote

Discussion in 'Building' started by RebeccaMoll, 29 Oct 2021.

  1. RebeccaMoll

    RebeccaMoll

    Joined:
    29 Oct 2021
    Messages:
    12
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hi

    We are wanting to buy a property which just came back with a level 3 for damp in the home buyers report. The property is a Victorian terrace with solid floors.

    There was minor evidence of damp when we viewed but we thought it was just condensation and ventilation issues as the property is left empty for several weeks at a time. Plus the window in the utility room has been removed and they dry clothes in there. Although there is also damp in the kitchen and dining area.

    On instruction of the surveyor we paid for a specialist damp report from a company with very good reviews. The survey came back with £20k - £23k to inject a damp proof course and take up the old quarry tiles and replace flooring. Also opening up of the chimney breast.

    They have also us to get a landscaper quote to reduce outside ground level which makes complete sense. However I cannot understand why the damp repairs quote is so expensive and whether the repairs are completely necessary.

    Do you think these costs can be justified? How easy would it be to replaster and do new flooring ourselves? And then just ensure the property is sufficiently heated and ventilated.

    Any help greatly appreciated!

    See a couple of pics below…

    upload_2021-10-29_19-46-14.png upload_2021-10-29_19-46-44.jpeg upload_2021-10-29_19-46-56.jpeg
     
  2. Sponsored Links
  3. mikeey84

    mikeey84

    Joined:
    7 Jan 2011
    Messages:
    1,278
    Thanks Received:
    143
    Location:
    Warwickshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    All of the things you have said, and the position of the damp patches leads me to believe that it's condensation.

    However, getting a dpc in the floor, dropping the external ground level and improving ventilation are all good ideas.

    I'm pretty skeptical of injected damp proofing in walls.

    I'd do the easy/cheap things first, and see if it improves
     
  4. noseall

    noseall

    Joined:
    2 Feb 2006
    Messages:
    43,972
    Thanks Received:
    2,722
    Location:
    Staffordshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I have always been of the opinion that DPC injection and those that profit from it, are a con. Back in the 80's and early 90's, mortgage companies would not release a damp vulnerable house loan until say a Sovereign Chemicals backed company had squirted their gear all over the ground floor masonry. This whole expensive 'remedy' was based upon several prods around the lower walls with nothing more than a two pronged damp meter.

    I'm not saying that it does not work, but I do question whether half of their invasive remedies were necessary. I'm also more of the opinion that it was the treated render that appeared to keep the damp back rather than the chemical injection.

    £23k would buy a fair chunk of work unless they are stripping out a bathroom or a fitted kitchen and re-fitting. The new floor will take a fair chunk though. You don't have red ash by any chance?
     
  5. RebeccaMoll

    RebeccaMoll

    Joined:
    29 Oct 2021
    Messages:
    12
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
  6. noseall

    noseall

    Joined:
    2 Feb 2006
    Messages:
    43,972
    Thanks Received:
    2,722
    Location:
    Staffordshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    That efflorescence is deffo damp and not condensation. Whether it's rising, penetrating or leaks is another matter.
     
  7. RebeccaMoll

    RebeccaMoll

    Joined:
    29 Oct 2021
    Messages:
    12
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hmmm interesting. The external ground level is quite high and a shed is very close to the other side of the wall with the efflorescence. Perhaps that is exacerbating the problem?

    They may have also used a gypsum plaster which is stopping the wall from breathing? Really hard to know what’s causing it and whether it can be easier solved.

    see pics of external ground level

    upload_2021-10-29_20-19-18.jpeg
     
  8. mikeey84

    mikeey84

    Joined:
    7 Jan 2011
    Messages:
    1,278
    Thanks Received:
    143
    Location:
    Warwickshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Would prolonged condensation from the lack of heating and poor ventilation not cause effervescence?
     
  9. noseall

    noseall

    Joined:
    2 Feb 2006
    Messages:
    43,972
    Thanks Received:
    2,722
    Location:
    Staffordshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Unlikely. Condensation is primarily a surface issue resulting in black spot mould. It's also fickle. You could move a sofa and the issue could disappear. Damp will not behave that way.
     
    Last edited: 29 Oct 2021
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Sponsored Links
  11. RebeccaMoll

    RebeccaMoll

    Joined:
    29 Oct 2021
    Messages:
    12
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    That’s not true. Condensation is all about the dew point of water vapour reaching a cold surface.

    If they are drying clothes in there and there’s no ventilation then the humidity will be high and the moisture will have nowhere to go. And if they don’t put heating on often again this exacerbates the issue.

    Yes mould is common with condensation but not a given.
     
  12. noseall

    noseall

    Joined:
    2 Feb 2006
    Messages:
    43,972
    Thanks Received:
    2,722
    Location:
    Staffordshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    So if you remove the moisture form the air, heat the space then everything will be ok. Good luck.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  13. mikeey84

    mikeey84

    Joined:
    7 Jan 2011
    Messages:
    1,278
    Thanks Received:
    143
    Location:
    Warwickshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    That's why I reckoned condensation, as the affected areas are all in classic low air movement areas, behind units, in corners etc, and mould can be stopped by various paints

    However, I'm no expert, hence the question
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. JohnD

    JohnD

    Joined:
    15 Nov 2005
    Messages:
    75,149
    Thanks Received:
    4,363
    Location:
    Crossgates, Europe
    Country:
    Cook Islands
    kitchen, solid floor, damp patch

    very likely a leaking pipe or drain. have you got a picture of the outside wall at the exact spot where the damp patch is? All the way up to the gutter and down to the ground. When the house was built, was the kitchen sink close to where the damp patch now is?

    Also, please stand back and take a wide pic of the wall(s) with damp, showing any chimneybreasts, fireplaces, or removed chimneys.

    It's not condensation.

    you had better scrape away the gravel outside until you find where the DPC is. Mark it with chalk and follow it round the house. Unless you are on a considerable hill, it will be at the same height all round.

    BTW, never invite anyone into your house who sells silicone injections. They will tell you to buy silicone injections.
     
    Last edited: 29 Oct 2021
  15. noseall

    noseall

    Joined:
    2 Feb 2006
    Messages:
    43,972
    Thanks Received:
    2,722
    Location:
    Staffordshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Those symptoms are classic damp issues. If the OP thinks that removing wet clothes from the environment will cure the damp, she will be very disappointed.
     
  16. RebeccaMoll

    RebeccaMoll

    Joined:
    29 Oct 2021
    Messages:
    12
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    It is in a few places mainly along the rear facade (see plan below). It’s also around the living room chimney but only minor here and probably due to not vent in the closed off chimney.

    The wall with the shed is where the utility wall is (pics with clothes drying). There used to be an old shed attached but it was removed 4 years ago and replaced with a shed.

    upload_2021-10-29_21-18-13.jpeg upload_2021-10-29_21-18-30.png
     
  17. RebeccaMoll

    RebeccaMoll

    Joined:
    29 Oct 2021
    Messages:
    12
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I don’t think it will cure but I am hoping it will help. Damp is essentially moisture within a structure so if either the moisture source is removed or the building can breathe sufficiently then symptoms should improve. I imagine there are other causes too, I’m just trying to think of every possible cause
     
Loading...

Share This Page