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RJ11-CAT5E DIY Broadband Extension cable

Discussion in 'Alarms, CCTV & Telephones' started by Martyn Bell, 12 Sep 2019.

  1. Martyn Bell

    Martyn Bell

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    I want to make my own broadband cable, instead of using the one supplied by my ISP. I want to use CAT5E cable terminated with RJ11. Should this be wired straight through or crossover?
     
  2. flameport

    flameport

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    Cat5e will not fit into an RJ11 plug.
    Cat5e has 8 wires, RJ11 is designed for 4.

    If this is to connect a modem to a wall socket, there is only one way to connect the wires, and only 2 of the wires are actually used.
     
  3. Martyn Bell

    Martyn Bell

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    I intend to connect 4 of the 8 wires to the RJ11. Only the 2 inner pins on RJ11 will carry data.
    I wish to hard wire the other end to my master socket data connections A & B.
    Can anyone tell me what colour wires I should use where please.
     
  4. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    The ADSL signal from the telephone exchange to the modem ( in the router ) travels best along low twist telephone cable ( CW1308 ) as it was developed to make use of existing telephone cables between exchange and houses.

    Putting an ADSL signal along CAT5 / 6 cable ( highly twisted ) can result in lower overall speed than using CW 1308 cable for the ADSL from master socket to the modem / router
     
  5. Martyn Bell

    Martyn Bell

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    Do I need Rj11 or Rj45 to connect to the hub?
     
  6. SFK

    SFK

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    Martyn
    You need need a RJ11 to connect to your Modem (Hub), using the center 2 contacts of 6 available (ie pin 3 and pin 4).

    So to transmit ADSL (and telephone) signal from the telephone box to the modem/router, use telephone cable (do not use ethernet, CAT Cable) from master socket data connections A & B to a RJ11 using the center 2 contacts of 6 available (ie pin 3 and pin 4).
    Suggest you buy RJ11 terminated cable and cut one end off:
    https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_....H0.XRJ11+cable.TRS0&_nkw=RJ11+cable&_sacat=0

    But if messing about with A and B ports, why not simply fit a BT ADSL master socket and buy a length of RJ11 both end terminated cable to got between this terminal and the modem? This has additional advantage of filtering telephone siginal from the RJ11 cable.
    https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_...570.l1313&_nkw=bt+master+socket+vdsl&_sacat=0

    SFK
     
    Last edited: 13 Sep 2019
  7. Martyn Bell

    Martyn Bell

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    My broadband Hub is in a room the other side of a wall to where my master socket is. I want to drill a small hole through the wall & make my own broadband cable. It only needs to be about 2 meters long. On-line there are suggestions that the flat untwisted broadband cable supplied with the hub is vulnerable to interference & replacing it with CAT5E or CAT6 cable is of advantage.
    Master DLS wire A to pin 3 Blue/White RJ11 & Master DLS wire B to pin 4 White/Blue RJ11. DLS DATA connections at a filtered master socket are accessible by the customer without infringing any laws.
    Thank you all for your help.
     
  8. SFK

    SFK

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    Sounds good. Except that ADSL is not designed to travel down cat cable.
    As Bernard said, it is designed to travel down CW1308 cable with its slow twist. It will travel down the supplied flat hub cable better than cat cable.

    If you want perfection in that last two meters go to ebay and buy a length of BT CW1308 and use that over the last 2m as it is the same type of cable used from BT cabinet to your house.

    Sfk
     
  9. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    ensure that it is solid copper conductors and not copper coated aluminium ( CCA ) conductors, CCA will work to begin with but over time there is a high risk that the punch down connections will fail.
     
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  10. SFK

    SFK

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    Bernard, thanks for that reminder.
    100pc agree (after buying dodgy Aluminium CAT cable that was supposed to be copper;).
    SFK
     
  11. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    There are some un-ethical companies selling CCA without the correct labelling.
     
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  12. Martyn Bell

    Martyn Bell

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    CW 1308 as far as I can tell is for ADSL, but CAT5E is better for VDSL because of its higher bandwidth. I will be using VDSL FTTC.
     
  13. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    VDSL can be faster than ADSL because the length of copper connection between network equipment and the modem/router is shorter.

    Fibre To The Cabinet ( FTTC ) means that data is carried by fibre optic to a street cabinet near to the house. There the data is transposed onto the copper pair to the house allowing for higher speeds over the much shorter copper pair.

    ADSL was specified as having to work over distances of up to 5 ( or was it 10 ) miles of twisted pair cable. The shorter copper routes with FTTC ( typical max 1 mile ) allows the specification for VDSL to work over a maximum distance of 1 mile.

    Where data waveform passes from CW1308 to CAT cable it sees a slight change of impedance which causes some of the signal to be reflected back wards. This reflection both weakens and degrades the signal received by the modem/router
     
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  14. Martyn Bell

    Martyn Bell

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    The reason I was thinking of using CAT5E cable is because it is recommended on-line & I already have some. I will use CW1308 if I can get it. Thanks Again.
     
    Last edited: 17 Sep 2019 at 9:19 AM
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