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Rooflight vs Roof Lantern?

Discussion in 'Roofing and Guttering' started by Jaunty, 20 Oct 2021.

  1. Jaunty

    Jaunty

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    We are replacing an old 6m x 4m felt roof on a rear single storey extension with EPDM and taking the opportunity to install a rooflight 1m x 2m. Bigger would be nicer but being cautious with the joists, weight-load etc. There is a small pitch but it is only 3-4 degrees at steepest point.

    Researching Options as follows

    1. Rooflight Panoroof style, where you silicone the glass unit straight on to timber frame from £600 upwards - Panoroof on ebay £799. Lowest initial cost and easiest for roofer to fit, but hard and costly to change if unit fails.

    2. Rooflight with aluminium frame from £1050. Atlas brand £1173. Roof maker brand £1694. Easy for roofer to fit. Can change unit if it fails.

    Both - a large heavy item to take delivery of. Shallow roof pitch means self cleaning glass will struggle to do much. I prefer the external look, as to me it is more 'modern' than a lantern.

    3. Roof Lanterns - Korniche brand £1000, Atlas £1375, Keylite £1475. And a lot more if you want. Shallow pitch means should be fine. A bit harder to fit but easier to take delivery off as comes in kit. Will add a feeling of space as ceiling is low in the extension. Let's more light in apparently as more glass (??). Self cleaning glass should work decently. Not as 'clean' a look when looking out over the roof from bedrooms.

    Thoughts - Given cost of the Korniche lanterns they seem the way to go for us, unless anyone has any particular negative advice to the contrary either about lanterns or the Korniche brand.

    As ever thanks for any input. Just writing it all down helps haha.
     
    Last edited: 20 Oct 2021
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  3. Londoner2

    Londoner2

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    I have a rooflight fitted, not the best quality but it serves the purpose.

    No planning permission is needed for rooflight, mine is triple glazed and does the job. However i dont know how long it will last ie seals, also despite it being self cleaning you still need to clean it every few months. The gradient of timber trame must be set right to allow rain to flow off.

    Lantern needs planning due to higher height, rain flow off is much better buts its heavier.

    You can also add ones with electric opening but that will increase the price dramatically.

    V IMPORTANT Both will need proper support, it would be better to have steels in rather then timber as the weight could cause deflection of roof.
     
    Last edited: 21 Oct 2021
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  4. Jaunty

    Jaunty

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    Thanks for taking the time. Appreciate the input. PS Not one of the 3 roofers has even mentioned about possible steels but then they’re roofers not structural engineers I guess.
     
  5. Jaunty

    Jaunty

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    Edit : Been looking into further and thought would add info in case of use to anyone searching in future. In terms of weight:

    Korniche roof lantern at 1.5m x 2m comes in at 103kg

    Double framed rooflight to size 1500 x 2000 will weigh 140kg approx

    Double glazed frameless system to same size will weigh - 135kg approx
    Triple glazed will weigh 185 kg approx
     
    Last edited: 25 Oct 2021
  6. kingandy2nd

    kingandy2nd

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  8. Jaunty

    Jaunty

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    Thanks. I was just editing my post to update as you posted, as I had some actual weights back from suppliers. The lantern is a lot lot lighter than a triple glazed rooflight
     
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  9. kingandy2nd

    kingandy2nd

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    Took 4 of us to shift mine. Had 2 x lengths of 5 x 2 wood to shoulder it to carry round the house. Even with 4 strong blokes it was really heavy and was bending the wood.

    97332DAF-361C-4A86-AE4F-55CA7A0DB6D3.png

    It was then easier to pull/slide up the youngmans scaffold board…but if you don’t own one of them i would recommend a crane or a genie lift
     
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  10. Jaunty

    Jaunty

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    That’s really helpful. Apart from the lead-time being longer, the lantern coming in kit form looks like a plus point in terms of overall manageability!
     
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  11. kingandy2nd

    kingandy2nd

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    Ah I see, one of these ones that looks like a mini conservatory roof?

    Yes, anything where there’s multiple panes of glass is going to be much more manageable it terms of installing :)
     
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