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Routing or partly cutting through a solid wood wall

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by d000hg, 31 Oct 2019.

  1. d000hg

    d000hg

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    If you have a wooden post, say 4x12", and you want to cut through partly on one side, how would you do this? Say to achieve something like this:

    upload_2019-10-31_13-11-32.png

    Assume the post is already in place. I am no carpenter and had thought this is a job for a router, but someone told me it's very hard to rout along an edge like this neatly. Also, you'd be cutting about 3" out which seems quite a lot for a router.

    Any advice the best technique and tools for this?

    In our case, we can access only the right and bottom sides of the post (and the top)
     
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  3. Chud

    Chud

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    OK...assuming the post is not structural?

    If not then a circular saw capable of plunge cuts (or a plunge saw) plus a multi-tool or some decent chisels should do the job - obviously though if it's oak heartwood that's 100's of years old I would suggest avoiding the job if you can!

    Make two vertical cuts (plunge) as far as you can top to bottom, set blade depth accordingly so the cuts just intersect. at the top/bottom of your cuts is going to be the difficult bits as you'll be left with the bits the saw can't cut into - at the end of the cuts mark on the post where the spindle/blade centre is as that will mark the end of your full depth cut - cut carefully repeatedly 5-10mm apart with the saw at 90 degrees to your first cuts making sure the depth is set appropriately and you don't overshoot - if space is tight it may be time to break out the multi-tool to do this, you'll need it anyway to finish the cut with a straight end cutter - if you're lucky you'll be able to knock out the fully cut section and all the wafers you've cut after doing this with ease.
    Then you're left with the ends, this is where the chisels and multi tool come into play - if using chisels then don't try to take too much off the top at once.

    As I've said it's not an easy job and I would really try and avoid it if possible - be extra careful making the cuts with the circular saw - make sure you're not over extending your reach etc and have a good base to stand on!
     
    Last edited: 31 Oct 2019
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  4. foxhole

    foxhole

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    Why do you want a rebate in a post? is it already insitu? how long is the cut?
     
  5. big-all

    big-all

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    not a job for a router as the maximum cut depth is half the shank so around 7mm [x10 passes]
    maximum cutter length about 55mm
    a normal circular saw will be around 65mm 2 1/2" depth off cut so you'd need a biggy
    far far easier to plant a bit on
     
  6. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    Too big for any router other than a powerful 1/2in model (BA, you can get 75mm straight cutters - but in any case attempting to use a router on a vertical post is hair raising even for an experienced user - a bit of an extreme sport), and to get a 3in / 75mm cut with a portable RIP saw will require at least a 210mm saw. Trying to cut this with a larger saw (e.g a 235mm saw- the next size up, so to speak) would be downright dangerous, and even a 210mm plunge saw (e.g Festool TS75) would be hazardous to the user as there is no way to adequately secure the guide rails. The ends of any cuts would need to be dealt with using a multitool, however, there are very few on the market with sufficient depth of cut for the task (see Festool Vectro and Fein Supercut) - most multitools can only manage 55 or 65 mm because of the blade designs.

    Because of the difficulty of achieving s decent end result, I have to ask why such a cut is needed
     
  7. Notch7

    Notch7

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    What length of cut?
    Through or stopped?
    Seen or unseen finish?

    There is no easy solution, nor one tool that would do the job.

    With stops and guides it could be stitch drilled -but a lot of cleaning up.
    I am a pretty experienced router user, but I wouldnt do that vertically its too big, too deep.

    I wouldnt be happy about a saw, but supported and with jigs It would be ok just about.

    Multi tool......best of luck o_O
     
  8. d000hg

    d000hg

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    Thanks. I guess a plunge saw is the tool I didn't know existed. This lets you pre-set the depth and track a straight cut, right? I am picturing that the smaller the width of the piece being removed, the more difficult because the saw wants something to rest on - right?

    So two cuts perpendicular and you've cut out a rectangular length... if the two ends were exposed it's literally just 2 cuts but if they are not accessible you're then having to do some woodwork the radius of the blade. Makes sense.

    Is 'rebate' the term I want for the end goal, i.e. in my example I want a 3x1" rebate if I was talking to a carpenter? I won't be touching this with a barge-pole myself because I know what level my skills are at :)
     
  9. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    I am a carpenter, I have the gear and frankly I wouldn't touch the job with a barge pole. Too little return and too much effort with too much tooling required TBH
     
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  11. d000hg

    d000hg

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    What do you mean by too little return? It's too difficult/risky?
     
  12. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    Are you willing to pay a guy at least half a day's labour, because that is the minimum that most decent tradesmen would want to charge for almost any task. In terms of risk, have you ever tried to use a relatively large (say 5 to 7kg) circular saw to make a vertical cut on an in-situ piece of timber, starting with a plunge cut, whilst making a neat and accurate cut? It is doable with the right gear, but it is also pretty risky (a kickback when making the plunge cut could be nasty), and the best way to proceed with any task is to find the least risky way of achieving the required end result. I did ask why this was necessary to see if a less risky solution could be found, but you didn't respond to that
     
    Last edited: 3 Nov 2019
  13. d000hg

    d000hg

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    Thanks for explaining... As an amateur it's hard for me to know what's easy or difficult for a pro, so that's helpful.

    The actual case is a bit more involved, I'm struggling to find how to describe it clearly.
     
  14. Notch7

    Notch7

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    Somebody skilled enough to do it probably wouldnt do it (n)
     
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  15. Ryler

    Ryler

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    Have never seen a solid wall made from 4" thick lumber.
    I'd probably take the chainsaw to it.
     
  16. d000hg

    d000hg

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    and?


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: 3 Nov 2019
  17. Ryler

    Ryler

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    Chainsaw it is then.:D
     
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