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Semi Circular Table

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by morpheus83uk, 18 Dec 2017.

  1. morpheus83uk

    morpheus83uk

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    Hello,

    I have another post about joining boards and this is what it is going to be used for. Essentially I am going to be making something similar to this:

    https://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/NzY4WDEwMjQ=/z/Dy0AAOSw9GhYe5pM/$_86.JPG

    With a semi circular top and bottom without the legs. The replacement for the legs will be a 20-30mm board joining the two.

    I was thinking that a mortise and tenon joint would be best where the joining board has two tenons on each side and the top and bottom semi circles have the mortise. Would this be the best approach as it would be supporting the weight over hanging, granted it will only be maybe a couple of remotes and drinks plus its own weight. Would this work or would I need to rethink this?

    Also if I needed the centre board to be 300mm tall if I were doing this would I need to make it say 400mm and have say a 50mm tennon / mortise to make up the height loss?

    Thanks

    James
     
  2. Roger928

    Roger928

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    That doesn't make sense.

    Neither does this...
    Maybe to you or someone it does.
    Most people who make things make drawings. Even if its only a sketch by hand.
    Isambard Kingdom Brunel drew all his designs on paper by hand.

    When I made the table and chairs in the link below I did the design layout on CAD. And before I went to cad I had to study basic chair and table design concepts.
    Then costly mistakes are avoided when the sawing begins with expensive lumber..
    http://i.picresize.com/cw4C
     
    Last edited: 19 Dec 2017
  3. morpheus83uk

    morpheus83uk

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    Basically its two semi circles with a board joining them. Does that explain it better?
     
  4. justbigboned

    justbigboned

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    Not really to be honest.

    If I understand correctly, you're talking about making a tenon the thickness of the board that is forming the mechanical joint and the mortice into the table top and bottom. That just isn't how furniture is designed.

    Not only is a mortice and tenon joint difficult for a beginner to cut accurately, in furniture making terms at least, it has to be correctly proportioned to retain strength.

    Without diagrams of what you are proposing it's nigh on impossible to give a proper opinion.
     
  5. justbigboned

    justbigboned

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    Roger, do you have any higher resolution pictures of that table set. I'm curious of the joinery used, particularly for the chair in the foreground. Good effort for a first attempt at chairs in any case
     
  6. morpheus83uk

    morpheus83uk

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    Here is the crudest drawing of what I mean. Where the ovals would be a semi circle.

    The rectangle would be the joining piece and would be a mortise and tenon joint to both the top and bottom. That's my thinking currently anyway.

    Does it make sense what I am trying to achieve? DSC_0465.JPG

    Thanks

    James
     
  7. big-all

    big-all

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    you will need at minimum two bits at 90%[disc on disc] or cross peices as timber has little strength across the grain
    you may get away with it if lightly loaded and very stable timber but no telling
     
  8. morpheus83uk

    morpheus83uk

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    Thanks.

    I was thinking of using 30mm thick pine which is roughly about 220mm wide which will be roughly around half the size of the circumference. The only things which will be on it are drinks and a couple of remotes at the most as I will be grooving out some cup holders. I was also thinking of doing the mortise and tenon about 17mm into the board giving the last remaining 10mm for the top since the semi circles are being made out of 27mm thick pine.

    Thanks

    Jamea
     
  9. Roger928

    Roger928

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    It's joined with dominoes.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: 22 Dec 2017
  10. big-all

    big-all

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    as an aside
    scaffold boards are normally fairly stable and 225x38mm ish
     
  11. morpheus83uk

    morpheus83uk

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    Thanks do you mean for the stand? Would the boards I am currently looking at work for my purpose or would I still need another board?
     
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