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Separate Spurs or Fused Connection Unit?

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by justintime2, 22 Aug 2013.

  1. justintime2

    justintime2

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    I'm looking to add some sockets (two doubles) to a cupboard to use for some computer gear. I'd like to house a network switch, PC printer and paper shredder in this but how can I establish how much current these are likely to draw?

    Would the above be likely to overload a 13A Fused Connection Unit?

    I'd also like an additional socket on the other side of this cupboard where a bedside cabinet is.

    Would the latter be better dealing with separately by creating a spur from a separate socket, in case it gets used for hair straighteners or similar at a later date?

    Regards
    Justin
     
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  3. riveralt

    riveralt

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    I am trying to see the difference between this question and the one you asked a few days ago - best re-read the answers there.
     
  4. justintime2

    justintime2

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    This is not about how many sockets can be attached to an FCU. This is about whether an FCU is more appropriate or possible without overloading the fuse in this use case, than spurs coming off other separate sockets that haven't already been used for a spur.

    Being mindful of what equipment is intended to be used from these sockets I am asking whether this is likely to overload the 13A fuse. This 13A capacity is obviously being shared among the sockets connected to the FCU and therefore less capable when multiple equipment plugged in to more than one socket attached to an FCU, than existing sockets or individual spurs.

    The other question concluded with replacing the FCU for a socket as the best solution, whereas I'm now considering whether an FCU would be the most appropriate for this other location.

    As the pc printer and network switch would be powered on all the time I would think the FCU would be more appropriate but only if the sum of the current draw from the use case doesn't exceed 13A.

    So does anyone know how I can calculate this for the following items please?

    24 Port Network Switch
    PC Printer
    Paper Shredder

    Would that leave any headroom for anything else to also be plugged in to one of the sockets connected to the FCU?
     
  5. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    The shredder will presumably only be used very occasionally, for brief periods, so is not much of an issue (unless it's some massive industrial model!). The other two will use far less than 13A (I hesitate to say 'next to nothing').

    Kind Regards, John
     
  6. riveralt

    riveralt

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    The amount of current drawn will be outlined in the manufacturers instructions. Simply add them up.
    I can tell you without looking that you will come nowhere near the 13Amp fuse rating you are planning to use.
    Each piece of equipment will have its own fuse probably no more than 3Amp for this kit.
    Question I raise is why don't you consider using an extension cable rather than going to the mess and inconvenience of adding sockets.
    I have two four gang extension cables hooked up to the back of my computer table taking all the equipment I have - never had a fuse blow yet.
     
  7. PrenticeBoyofDerry

    PrenticeBoyofDerry

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    Yes, you find out the output rating and divide be the voltage rating of each appliance, then you add them together.
    If you know or can source the output of you own appliances, this shouldn't be too difficult.
     
  8. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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  9. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    He didn't, actually :)



    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
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  11. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Yes, we all do it at times! A bit ironic that I did it so soon after I'd commented on someone else's transgression :)

    Kind Regards, John
     
  12. justintime2

    justintime2

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    Hi

    Thanks for all the responses albeit I didn't understand 'He didn't'?

    The shredder is quite a large type but I can't find any power specifications for it other than its plug is fitted with a 13A fuse.

    http://www.fellowes.com/gb/en/Products/Pages/product-details.aspx?prod=UK-3245101


    The printer I have found the following in its specifications;

    Power supply : Universal power adapter (external)
    Power requirements :
    Input voltage : 100 to 240 VAC (± 10%), 50/60 Hz (± 3Hz)
    Output voltage : 32 Vdc at 2000 mA
    Power consumption : 30 watts printing (Fast Draft Mode); 32 watts copying (Fast Draft Mode)

    I've not purchased the network switch yet but know it will need to be one as large as 24 ports.

    Regards
    Justin
     
  13. justintime2

    justintime2

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    The network patch panel will terminate inside a cupboard for aesthetic reasons and that it doesn't need to be accessed very often once set up. It makes more sense for the network switch to be located next to the patch panel so that only short patch cables are required to connect the patch panel to the switch. Since I'm putting the network switch in the cupboard its an opportunity to have a clearer desk / working environment by getting the printer and shredder out of the way too. I couldn't run an extension lead into a cupboard without having to have the cupboard door open all the time.

    Regards
    Justin
     
  14. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Don't worry. That was just a joke about an error in formatting a message which made it appear as if the quote came from the wrong person!
     
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  15. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    You could run the extension lead through small hole in the cupboard.

    It would mean removing the plug, then put the cable through the hole and then refit the plug.

    You could fit a few double surface mount sockets on a piece of 4 by 1 timber to make a bespoke extension lead provided you provide secure clamping of the cable. Each socket is then individually switched. Or if you use singles it is more work but they can be spaced to allow over size wall wart power supplies to be plugged without blocking the adajcent socket.
     
  16. justintime2

    justintime2

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  17. justintime2

    justintime2

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    Two twin sockets will do me nicely and as its the loft bedroom I can access an existing socket to run some t&e to, for the FCU. Having them fitted in the wall will create a neater look.

    Regards
    Justin
     
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