Shower extractor fan ceiling mounted. Which one is the best

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I have a bathroom in the loft which need a ceiling mounted extractor fan. I`m struggling to set my mind on what I have to buy and install.

I came across some inline model which seems very powerfull but not sure how this will be installed under the ceiling and how easy would be to replace in the future without taking ceiling down.

I also found the Manrose QF100t heavily regarded for a bathroom. Do you use some patresses/ plywood to hold it up on the ceiling or the plasterboard will take the weight?

Thanks
 
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Why does the fan need mounting in the ceiling, will it exit through a roof tile? In the main I have used some form of ducting to get removed air where I want it, through floor space, through ceiling space, so three standard options, in wall, in ceiling, or in line, and the big question is where will and condensate run, will it end up outside or in a drain? Or will it form pools in the ducting and lead to legionnaires?

How do you really expect anyone not on site to work out best option? The roof tile option likely works best as it continues to work when fan not running, however there are a host of shutters that can actually stop it venting when not running, my fan does not work, I get no mould, and so don't really care if it does not run, I have realised it is down to natural thermals, if the shower door seals at bottom there is very little air movement so water vapour not moved into rest of room, but shower over a bath or with just a curtain and no sealed door, whole room gets damp.

So no one who is not there on site, can work out what is required.
 
Why does the fan need mounting in the ceiling, will it exit through a roof tile? In the main I have used some form of ducting to get removed air where I want it, through floor space, through ceiling space, so three standard options, in wall, in ceiling, or in line, and the big question is where will and condensate run, will it end up outside or in a drain? Or will it form pools in the ducting and lead to legionnaires?

How do you really expect anyone not on site to work out best option? The roof tile option likely works best as it continues to work when fan not running, however there are a host of shutters that can actually stop it venting when not running, my fan does not work, I get no mould, and so don't really care if it does not run, I have realised it is down to natural thermals, if the shower door seals at bottom there is very little air movement so water vapour not moved into rest of room, but shower over a bath or with just a curtain and no sealed door, whole room gets damp.

So no one who is not there on site, can work out what is required.


Got flat roof and thinking to extract through roof joist at fascia level. Just confused if I install an inline one how this will be fitted and how easy is to replace otherwise will just use a normal one and screw to the ceiling
 
What is normal? When I came to do late mothers wet room I had to consider how to fit one, the building inspector insisted in spite of opening window, I decided to use in-line, it was noisy, and failed even before work signed off, so had to be abandoned as could not get it out without dropping ceiling, and used a ceiling mounted one instead, however as soon as I got the completion certificate it was switched off at the isolator and never used again, so was not worried about the expanding tube holding water, it was simply not used.

However if you intend to use it, then water must drain, so smooth walled pipes, with a fall, so water will drain out. So
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roof fan may work, but do you really want a hole in the roof, but after that it is down to duct route, remember any air blow out needs replacing, units like this
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heat the incoming air from out going air, so one hole is in and out, but in line versions
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clearly have a water trap problem, in my first house I had vents in every door to allow air to return to central heating boiler, my problem was static electric shocks, and would put trays of water into air intake to try it increase humidity, it was far too dry in the house, this house today sits at 52% humidity, last house more like 75% humidity, father-in-laws house was around 85% and this does matter when looking at ventilation.

And of course if a new bathroom/shower-room as I found out to my cost, you need planning permission so it is down to what the LABC inspector will pass, you have to pay the council a lot of money for that completion certificate, so ask the inspector what he wants.
 
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It`s a new bathroom and currently under BC sign off. We have been asked to have shower fan extractor. No matter what you use despite the window the want see one. I will go for ceiling mounted and bring it outside through roof joist trying to make pipe sloped as much as I can.
 

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