Simple Q. regarding braided tap hoses...

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by SimoninEaston, 6 Feb 2018.

  1. SimoninEaston

    SimoninEaston

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    I've just plumbed in 2 appliances in my kitchen, replacing some very untidy existing work. All is now in apple-pie order! However, the monobloc tap tails are joined to the supply by a couple of speedfit unions (minus the collars that keep them locked...) and I'm inclined to put in place a pair of stainless-steel braided flexible hoses, but a chum told me not to use such hoses, saying they're unreliable and will sooner or later start to leak. I'm thinking that rubber-lined braided hoses have been in use in the automotive industry for decades and are very reliable, under much higher pressures than they'll see in my kitchen. Who's right - my chum or me?!
     
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  3. stem

    stem

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    Hmm..... well I had four 'blowouts' as per my photo below. The braiding failed and the rubber inflated through the opening like a balloon before splitting suddenly and dramatically, all within 5 years of installation, and they weren't kinked or twisted either.


    I'm sure others have had better experiences, but all of mine are now replaced with soldered copper. I'll let you come to your own conclusion.
     
  4. flameport

    flameport

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    Braided hoses do work and in some cases are unavoidable (cheap taps that are supplied with such things).
    However rigid pipework is always preferable.
     
  5. Just what sort of pressure are you working with Stem; I've seen the braiding go, but never the rubber.
     
  6. SimoninEaston

    SimoninEaston

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    Right - solid pipe it is then!
     
  7. Keithmac

    Keithmac

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    Our bathroom has them (11 years old) and kitchen (9 years old) and touch wood they're all still fine.
     
  8. gasbanni

    gasbanni

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    I met a loss adjuster on a job and I asked him what was the most common cause of floods in houses ?? We had a bit of time to kill.

    Flexible tap connectors .........that's what he said. Nothing else came close.
     
  9. gasbanni

    gasbanni

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    I'd be changing them now if they're that old !! I don't know how you can sleep at night !!!!!
     
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  11. gasbanni

    gasbanni

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    Deffo !
     
  12. John D v2.0

    John D v2.0

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    If they're rubbing on something every time the taps open or close they'll wear through in a few years. Kinked is not as bad as rubbing.
     
  13. Daveydub

    Daveydub

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    I have only dealt with 3 failed hoses. All of them after midnight, one of them I had to get the woman to come & pick me up cos of the drink. They don't just drip when they fail they are just open ended 15mm pipes.
     
  14. stem

    stem

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    Sorry I don't know the pressure, I've never measured it, just Severn Trent standard I guess ....... The split in the rubber is about 20mm long

    As the four* hoses that split all were installed at the same time, I'm suspecting that they could be from a bad batch maybe. Others that were in place before them were OK. Unfortunately I didn't get them, so I don't know their origin.

    To put the minds of others as rest, when they did 'go' it was always just after the tap had been used, so someone was always present and we were able to isolate the water quickly and no damage was done.

    *I thought it was four that had gone, but Mrs Stem thinks three, and she's usually right :whistle:
     
  15. John D v2.0

    John D v2.0

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    Always know where your stopcock is would be the lesson to anyone with plumbing in their house.

    Could be worse, I knew someone who lived on canal boats, he said by far the number one cause of boat loss was people having permanent water connection plus a leak. In a house you get wet joists, in a boat everything gets wet as it hits the bottom.
     
  16. dilalio

    dilalio

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    I can concur with that.
    Had one go in my own kitchen last year and loss adjuster said same.
     
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