Slow filling of Geberit wall hung toilet frame tank

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We have several of the 112cm wall hung Geberit sigma toilet frames which we are slowly connecting one by one. Most of the tanks fill quickly but for some reason one of the tanks fills really slowly like 3-4 minutes despite the stopcock in the flush plate being fully opened.

The pressure on the douche value and the basin tap is fine so I cannot figure out what the issue is. When I also flush the square shaped toilet, the amount of water and the water pressure coming into the bowl is not, in my opinion great either. I compare this to one of my other toilets in the house with the same frame but round bowl and the fill speed on the tank is like 15 seconds and the water delivery to the bowl is fast and high pressure.

Any suggestions of how I can rectify this problem?
 
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The pressure on the douche value

Do you know these things shouldn't be connected to the mains??

Are the toilets all new? The fill issue could be a blocked filter into the fill valve or just a dodgy new valve. Time to check the valve. As far as the low flush is concerned then that's usually be down to the bowl design.
 
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Any chance of a sticky about douches?

"Because of how douches are intended to be used and where they are located, there is a high risk of contamination to the drinking water supply. A douche is classed as a Fluid Category 5 – the highest possible risk level – which often means being fed from storage or alternatively must be protected from backflow by an appropriate device. The dangers posed by a douche are particularly acute if the hand shower is installed incorrectly. The length of hose often used to connect them to the mains supply means there is an additional risk of water from the toilet pan being siphoned back into the drinking water supply.


While douches have always been common across Continental Europe, recent years have seen them gain popularity in the UK. However, water regulations and fitting guidelines for douche installations in the UK are very different than across those on the continent – and if installers fail to adhere to the requirements there is a risk of drinking water being contaminated, putting customers’ health at risk.


The problem lies in the fact that many douche devices, typically installed in the bathroom or the en-suite, can reach below the spill over level of WC pans. Many of these devices are not being installed with adequate backflow prevention posing the risk of contaminated water getting back into the drinking water supply..."


https://www.hvpmag.co.uk/Douches--what-the-installer-needs-to-know/8955
 
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Any chance of a sticky about douches?
Might not be a bad idea (y)

The main problem with ablution devices (douches) in the UK is that a large proportion are being attached to the mains cold water feed at the toilet which means typically the douche can actually reach inside the toilet and be immersed in the toilet waste water, not just reach the top (spillover) which is illegal. It is the same with these retrofit bidet attachments for toilets, unless they are fed correctly they are also illegal.

In the UK there is a certain demographic who are in the majority of who are having these devices installed, as they are being used in place of toilet paper. That means there can be a spray of matter contaminated water left on the device, or the device actually being left in the toilet (I have seen it). That water/bacteria can then find its way back into theirs and others mains drinking water, especially the mixer type fed by unequal supplies. :sick:

In the continent hand held sprays (not douches) are typically used in a different way and are more for cleaning feet etc when coming in from outside/beaches etc and aren't normally located near the toilet. The main appliance used for cleaning private areas in the continent are typically bidets, these are now normally over the top tap bidets (taps with an air gap) rather than an ascending spray (immersed).

There are a host of EU water regs, that mirror the UK water regs as far as backflow protection and contamination is concerned, unfortunately, as intimated, their local regs don't tend to be quite as strict. A lot of the more southern EU countries tend to have a higher chlorine content in their mains water too as some of their supplies don't tend to be as clear as some in the UK, adding more protection against bacteria.
 
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I find most customers have no clue that water can (in certain circumstances) go back up the pipe!
The news has, on occasion, been met with complete disbelief.
 
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I find most customers have no clue that water can (in certain circumstances) go back up the pipe!
The news has, on occasion, been met with complete disbelief.

Yup, used to come across it regularly up here in Glasgow in certain areas. Especially given a lot of the properties I've seen them in are tenement flats, all running off a shared rising main, with tanked water in the attic. It's a perfect breeding ground for any bacteria, that can then feed down into some of the bathrooms that haven't been changed over to mains water, where people brush their teeth, wash, bathe etc.

In some cases it even ends up in an argument, I'm then told I'm lying even when I show them the regs and then called certain names because I refused to fit them unless they are prepared to fit the correct system setup. I just refuse to fit them and leave at that point.

I don't know why they don't regulate them and ensure they can't be sold on their own and should only be sold with a break tank or interrupter.
 

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