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supporting knocked out chimney stacks

Discussion in 'Building' started by DIYedboy, 24 Aug 2012.

  1. DIYedboy

    DIYedboy

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    I have bought a 1930's mid terraced house, the stacks were knocked out by the previous owners, but the support for the remaining stack on the party wall ain't great, basically two stacks with 2 flues in rise up the loft wall, then they angle across to meet and create a single 4 pot stack (8 pot including the neighbours half). Will gallows brackets and prestressed concrete lintels (one for each stack) be acceptable? The stack above the roof has been lowered on both sides and only 4 courses project above the ridge tiles
     
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  3. tony1851

    tony1851

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    The problem here is that gallows brackets are not universally accepted by building inspectors. Much depends on how much brickwork remains and the condition of that brickwork.
    Safest way (though obviously more trouble) is to try and put 2 steel beams across from front to back wall.
     
  4. joe-90

    joe-90

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    Well it hasn't fallen down has it - so why not?
     
  5. tony1851

    tony1851

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    These things dont' fall down because of the corbelling effect of the brickwork. The OPs chimney will probably still be there in 100 years.
    But building inspectors don't live on planet earth - that's the problem.
     
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  7. joe-90

    joe-90

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    Yes I know how they are built - so just do as he suggests and forget about it. Why get the authorities involved?
     
  8. tony1851

    tony1851

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    Agree 100% - no point in opening a can of worms if it's not necessary.
    But OP had said he'd moved in. and I assumed it was something he had to attend to, perhaps as a condition of a mortgage?
     
  9. DIYedboy

    DIYedboy

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    Thanks for the replies lads, to be honest, the only reason I'm doing it is because when I want to sell the house I'm bound to come unstuck from the buyer's solicitor or a surveyor etc

    My real question is, is it better to use gallows brackets and concrete lintols or gallows brackets 5mm plate and angle iron between the brackets? the chimney stack stands 12" forward of the wall
     
  10. tony1851

    tony1851

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    Personally, I'd use brackets with steel plate and angle rather than the concrete beam.
    The steel plate will give complete support to any odd loose bricks, while concrete lintels, particularly the 65mm ones, can be unreliable and crack easily.
     
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