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The correct material for repointing?

Discussion in 'Building' started by MattB83, 1 Feb 2021.

  1. MattB83

    MattB83

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    Hi,
    I was hoping to add repointing to my to-do list. I'd like to learn how to do this - starting with a small outhouse on the side of the house. I've been reading posts here and trying to work out what type of mortar I need to use.

    Here are some photos - as you can see someone's done some very selective repointing at some point - literally only a few mm thick on top of the original in some places - to me this looks like a completely different material - if this is cement then this isn't great for the brickwork is it?

    Appreciate any advice on what material to use:

    PICS - https://photos.app.goo.gl/yncaJ1AMTmd57mgHA

    If it's relevant - house was build approx in the 1950's our survey suggested.
     
    Last edited: 1 Feb 2021
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  3. sxturbo

    sxturbo

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    Ok so you have lime mortar originally.

    But some joker has attempted to do some repairs in the past and used cement.

    You need to remove this and replace with hydraulic lime mortar.

    Speak to a specialist lime mortar company for help and advice. There is a couple of online outlets that are very good
     
  4. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    In the 50's, and with commons? o_O
     
  5. Notch7

    Notch7

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    Wrong colour sand?
     
  6. MattB83

    MattB83

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    Was lime mortar unlikely in the 50s?
     
  7. CBW

    CBW

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    Could be fast set cement or wrong sand/cement ratio, or incorrect sand used, either way it looks harder than the brick, so would need removing imo.
     
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  8. sxturbo

    sxturbo

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    No not really.

    Between the 30's and 60's was the transition to cement mortar.

    The 3rd pic you posted looks like lime mortar.
     
  9. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    The post war building boom was with predominantly cement mortar. Lime would be rare and tended to be for niche individual builds away from the new urban estates.
     
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  11. MattB83

    MattB83

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    Thanks all. In the absence of a clear answer, and I went ahead and pointed with lime mortar - and it wasn't lime originally, would this cause problems?
     
  12. johnny2007

    johnny2007

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    Just rake an inch into the joints, clean everything perfectly (hoover, then air compressor, then hoover again), spray a mist of wet water and then repoint with sand/cement/plasticizer.
    Make sure it's not going to freeze, so keep an eye on the forecast.
     
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  13. MattB83

    MattB83

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    Is an inch enough - if the mortar is in really poor condition? I think I could scrape an inch out with my finger in most places it's so crumbly.
     
  14. johnny2007

    johnny2007

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    Then you need a bulldozer and a few good bricklayers.
    Then roofers, plumbers, electricians, etc. :ROFLMAO:
     
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  15. MattB83

    MattB83

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    An inch it is!
     
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  16. sxturbo

    sxturbo

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    No it wouldn't, but if you don't the reverse it will.
     
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