Trim for new timber sash windows - £15/metre?!

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Hello all!

I'm getting round to replacing some shoddy pvc windows in my flat (Victorian conversion) with softwood timber sash. I'm using a company that manufactures in Poland (it seems to be well-regarded from the research I've been able to do).

In any event, the cost of the 5 windows is fine, installation costs likewise. They initially quoted assuming no need for external and internal quadrant/trim (before the site visit, because I suspect they assumed a straight like-for-like replacement rather than top-hung to sash).

Now that they have come back, I am COMPLETELY baffled. They are quoting £15+VAT per linear metre of 20mmx20mm trim!! Which means that with 70+ metres (inside and outside) the cost of trim comes to >45% of the cost of the windows, which is obviously completely crazy. I bought solid oak beading last year for about £2.50/metre.

Keen to hear if I'm being thick and missing something. I thought they maybe meant £1.50/metre and the decimal was in the wrong place.....
 
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That's exactly the profile they have quoted, thanks. And yes, the price there is exactly what I was expecting. Presumably I can get any profile I fancy? Is there a "standard" one that is generally used in Victorian sash windows?

While we're on the topic of hardwood vs pine. The windows themselves are in softwood (which I've been is perfectly acceptable). But you would recommend I go for the trim in hardwood? The cost differential is minimal so I'm not fussed about that, more about what makes most sense.

Thanks for all your help!
 
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There's no reason you can't use a softwood trim, just remember to maintain it or it tends to degrade quicker than hardwoods. A trim's a trim to a certain extent, so as long as it provides the finishing touch you're looking for, you can essentially go for any design you want as long as it's not impeding the opening of window in any way. Personally I'd stick with the basic quadrant however that's just my opinion.

Just had a thought, will quadrant trim definitely be required once the install's complete?
 
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Thanks yet again! I'm honestly not sure why quadrant trim was suggested,I just assumed that was their "style". Would there normally be a reason for using that specific type of trim? What other options would there be? Like a standard rectangular trim?
 
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DG UPVC trim is much cheaper, around 1/4 the price of wood and will outlast the wood. It comes in a variety of colours, in 5m lengths.

Lookup Eurocell's on line catalogue.
 
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Where would you need the trim?

Externally the box sash would normally butt up against the inner face of the external brickwork.....no trim required.

Internally it would be normal to finish with liner and architrave.....if you have plaster reveals maybe it's trim to cover the plaster - wood join.

Are the new windows shallower or deeper than the space available in the window opening?

I think there is more to this than a simple quadrant trim......make sure you understand what and how they are fitting the windows to avoid any differences in expectation.
 
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DG UPVC trim is much cheaper, around 1/4 the price of wood and will outlast the wood. It comes in a variety of colours, in 5m lengths.

Lookup Eurocell's on line catalogue.

Thanks Harry! I thought it might look a bit odd to have timber windows and then upvc trim? Though I appreciate the upvc is much improved and comes with a timber effect foil now.
 
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Where would you need the trim?

Externally the box sash would normally butt up against the inner face of the external brickwork.....no trim required.

Internally it would be normal to finish with liner and architrave.....if you have plaster reveals maybe it's trim to cover the plaster - wood join.

Are the new windows shallower or deeper than the space available in the window opening?

I think there is more to this than a simple quadrant trim......make sure you understand what and how they are fitting the windows to avoid any differences in expectation.


So the existing upvc casements are about 70mm deep, the new sash will be 145mm. But there is stil enough depth to fit in the reveal. The available width on the inside is wider than the width of the external brickwork (if that makes sense). So presumably on the inside the trim would be to cover the gap between frame and window.

On the outside, they've said "windows will be secured with silicone around them, but with larger gaps it is advised to use trims like quarter trims + silicone." So it might be there's no need for trim? Though in my limited experience I've yet to see a Victorian building in London with straight walls...
 
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Yeah it's a slightly strange one. As touched on by Notch7, normally windows are measured to fit the existing opening as closely as possible, with gaps filled by mortar and/or silicon depending on size. I thought the request for quadrant was more of a design feature requested by you or suggested by them. If you do a Google image search on sash windows, you'll see various install variations. Practically none of them have quadrant (or other) trim on the installation.

Tend to agree with Notch7, make sure you know exactly what's being installed before they actually go ahead. It could be they're simply covering themselves with the quadrant trim suggestion in case any gaps are larger than expected, however the walls can't be out by that much, or are they? Some pics would be good. What you don't want to end up with is different looks on different windows i.e. some with quadrant some without. Suppose it wouldn't be the end of the world but consistency is best.

Given the windows are wood, personally I'd stick with wood quadrant if it has to be used.
 
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Really helpful advice, thanks both. I'm going to leave out the trim altogether as far as the installation goes. At least then in the unlikely event they've left larger gaps than there should be, it'll be immediately apparent even to me, and they won't be hidden behind trim. I've requested that all existing bits/trims of upvc are removed, so it'll be an entirely fresh install.

Not sure how well you can see, but pictures here of the existing upvc setup.
 

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Thanks for the pics. Looking at the inside, trim pieces may indeed be required here and there, however not necessarily quadrant. As for the outside, I think your approach is the correct one. The key is not to overthink it I suppose (from a consumer perspective.) Assuming they have measured correctly, looking at the building structure, I see no reason why there should be excessive gaps.

And if you're happy to, post a pic of the finished job so we can see the outcome :)
 
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Ha, yes, overthinking is a bit of a speciality of mine. Especially now with little else to do....

LAST question (I promise) - in the windows themselves, I don't like black spacers (I feel it just stands out and looks odd against white everything else). White or grey spacer both fine, nothing I'll ever notice anyway?
 
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