1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

Trying to do it by the book, but limited choices!

Discussion in 'Building' started by Rodders66, 25 Feb 2018.

  1. Rodders66

    Rodders66

    Joined:
    29 May 2011
    Messages:
    45
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dorset
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hello All,

    I'm not a regular, but looking for advice, am an engineer by trade and a suffering DIY'er over 30 years with a fair few kitchens / bathrooms / fireplaces to my name ;)

    So here's the situation.

    We've been in our family home for 25 yrs, it's on a large plot approx 100yrs old & near the south coast and we love it here. The garden has been a labour of love and loads of great times with kids etc...

    Unfortunately, my missus was diagnosed a while ago with a Parkinsons (early onset) and mobility is going to be an issue. We really don't want to move but I need to consider making the place easier to move around.

    Basically we have a large room attached (here when we moved in) to the longest side of the house (8mx4m), its kind of a conservatory with a lean to poly-carbonate roof supported on timbers but all of the walls are cavity and sat on strip foundations approx 200mm deep.

    There are three windows and a large sliding set of doors along its length.

    The room is accessed by two doors to the lounge and the kitchen, they're not exterior grade doors.

    None of the ground floor has insulation underneath.
    The room is heated by 2 radiators (i know this isn't right)
    The roof is water tight but i've thrown up some sheets of painted PLY some time ago that reduces glare and heat in summer.

    We also burn a fair amount of fossil fuel with additional fan heaters in winter when it's too cold. We use the room all year and its a great room.

    The plan is to knock the kitchen through to this room, bring all floor levels up to the same level, and insulate the entire GF. Replace the poly-carb roof with tile and Velux windows, replace existing windows & sliding doors which are crap and leak heat.

    Because of the developing situation, our attention is very much on the short/medium term, and I really don't want to spend extra time working to pay off a mortgage extension. We'd like to spend our reducing valuable time on better things!

    The things I know (I think)...
    1- the footings on the room are theoretically not deep enough to support a traditional tile & timber roof structure.

    2- opening up the kitchen will contravene BC rules on the conservatory use, with the heating system now being compromised.

    3 - the opening will certainly need a structural survey

    4- we have at least one developer every couple of years ask if we wan to sell so they can put up a2-3 places on our plot, so the next person to buy this house will develop the plot and not care about a 'non-spec' extension.

    Finally the question!
    Assuming I take a risk and choose to put up a newer timber roof structure,
    what would people recommend I put up to cover it?....I am conscious that a lighter weight material maybe better, and I've seen some kind of plastic tile effect sheets...are they any good?

    Can I use Velux with them?

    ...or is a composite tile better, even if it's heavier?

    Any advice welcome.
    Cheers
     

    Attached Files:

  2. ^woody^

    ^woody^

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2006
    Messages:
    29,632
    Thanks Received:
    3,847
    Location:
    West Mids
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I can't imagine those walls not being able to support a tiled roof. Any clay or concrete tile as they are more or less the same weight. You can get light-weight imitation slates too, but they may not match in.

    If you are planning to be there 15-20 years, then a flat or slight pitch with an EPDM cover will see you out and may be cheaper than tiles and easier.

    Plastic imitation tiles are all the rage for the conversion market. I'm not sure on their life or cost, but typically life is limited and more relatively expensive per m2. Not sure about the noise.
     
  3. Sponsored Links
  4. Rodders66

    Rodders66

    Joined:
    29 May 2011
    Messages:
    45
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dorset
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks Woody,

    I had the same thoughts, especially given that any additional weight is shared 50:50 between the main house foundations and outer room foundations. I forgot to say that I'm looking to possibly use UFH across the ground floor especially as I'd lifting to insulate the entire ground floor, and we may need to convert the existing lounge to a ground floor bedroom in the future. Are there any considerations I should make here?

    It sounds stupid but I don't wish to draw any additional attention to the change from poly-carb to a normal roof, we aren't overlooked much and I'm banking on the one neighbour not giving a toss if I change the roof material. Therefore I reckon on keeping the pitch the same.

    Will there be restrictions on using composite tiles when it comes to weather, and are the sheets of tiles better for this application...anyone?
     
  5. ^woody^

    ^woody^

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2006
    Messages:
    29,632
    Thanks Received:
    3,847
    Location:
    West Mids
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I don't think that any plastic tiles have the necessary fire resistance (or sound or thermal) to meet building regulations unless there are other measures taken to deal with that. By the time you have messed about with plastic tiles getting the roof upto any standard, you could just as well have done it properly

    It's relatively easy to do any extension/conversion work without any required permissions, but the pertinent issue is the effect this could have on any house insurance.
     
  6. Sponsored Links
  7. Rodders66

    Rodders66

    Joined:
    29 May 2011
    Messages:
    45
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dorset
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hadn't considered house insurance!
     
  8. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2019
    Country:
    United Kingdom

    If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

    Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


    Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

     
Loading...

Share This Page