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Uneven floor level following repair work

Discussion in 'Floors, Stairs and Lofts' started by dogfonos, 11 Oct 2018.

  1. dogfonos

    dogfonos

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    I'd appreciate advice/guidance on this matter...

    Recently had an old, uneven concrete floor repaired with a water-based fibre levelling compound. The idea being to leave the floor ready for a floor installer to do fine levelling and lay vinyl covering.

    The floor now looks great and feels solid but it's not level. I haven't thoroughly checked out levels (intend to do that at the weekend) but even a quick check reveals an upward slope towards one end of the room. It even feels like a slope when walked on so we're not talking about just a few mm's.

    Is there any way to level the floor by selectively removing some of the top surface? Some sort of wet sanding/scraping machine maybe?
     
  2. KenGMac

    KenGMac

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    dogfonos, good evening.

    If possible, once you have checked out the levels and can prove same, suggest you ask the contractor to return and sort out the problem.

    Once you are positive and have evidence of how far off level the floor still is you can confront the contractor who laid the material.

    Ken
     
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  4. dazlight

    dazlight

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    There is no sure thing as a self levelling compound. Sick of Diy bags calling it that.
    They are self smoothing screeding compounds.
    You can level with them but can take a lot of units to do this and battens to set heights and work to them.
     
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  5. dogfonos

    dogfonos

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    Thanks for your responses.

    Not as bad as I feared. There's a 17mm level difference between highest and lowest patches close to each end. That's over a 4m x 2m floor area. What would be an acceptable level tolerance on that floor area?

    Since we've had a fair bit of building work done over the past year and a half, I've had to lower my initial (unreasonable?) expectations regarding work quality so maybe a 17mm level variation is OK?

    I could do but part of me thinks what chance of them getting it right second time around when they didn't get it right first time. They may not have the techniques or the necessary skills.

    I've checked over the floor thoroughly and worked out what I would like done. If 3 - 5mm could be shaved off a high patch (about the area of a dustbin lid) and the final smoothing layer applied up to 5mm deep in the lowest area then the floor would be adequately level. Adding 5mm to the lowest part would result in a slight slope into the adjoining room but, like I said, I've lowered my expectations. Is there a machine that would shave up to 5mm off? I'm happy to do the shaving bit myself.

    One thing has been decided: I'll not have the floor (or parts of it) dug up - again. We've had ongoing issues which has meant that parts of this floor have already been dug up three times before. If the high point can't be shaved down then we'll do what we can with the final smoothing layer and accept the result.
     
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  7. dazlight

    dazlight

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    You need a mini hand grinder. You can hire them or buy a cheap one and a grinding disc
     
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