Want to paint a blue front door white

Discussion in 'Decorating and Painting' started by catpuss1, 28 May 2013.

  1. catpuss1

    catpuss1

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    Want to paint my very old 1790 front door which at present dark blue to white. There is at least 50 years of paint underneath. Don"t want to take off hinges( may never get back on also alarm sensor present) saw online a newer version of peel away what does everyone think? Also what exterior white paint should I use? Any suggestions most welcome
     
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  3. Bosswhite

    Bosswhite

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    Sand down, fill make, good, apply two/three coats of a good Exterior Undercoat, one coat Exterior Gloss, job done.
     
  4. catpuss1

    catpuss1

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    So you don"t think stripping is a good idea?
     
  5. Jackrae

    Jackrae

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    1790 or 1970 ?

    If the former then it's probably oak so best leaving any old coats on.

    If the latter, why do you want to strip it - lots of work and it'll take a great deal of effort to get it looking good.
     
  6. catpuss1

    catpuss1

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    1790 old I know non standard door fit only door in terrace that is original but has been Badly planed at some point. So best to sand and fill any suggestions on undercoat and gloss?
    I have painted it in the past but very unlevel (is that a word?) never been the best paint job myself or a painter has done.
     
  7. emilybronte

    emilybronte

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    Old doors can look better if 50 years of paint are removed (multiple layers of thick oil-based paint tend to clog up and obscure the fine detail of the mouldings). It must however be done properly, by someone who can use a hot air stripper without burning the wood and a triangular paint remover tool for grooves in the mouldings. It takes ages. I am inclined to agree that if the existing paint is sound and there are no clogged-up mouldings, a good sanding is the best preparation.

    The peelaway stuff is an expensive and disappointing gimmick IME.
     
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  8. catpuss1

    catpuss1

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    Ok doing this front door and so far it taken me nearly four days!!!( drying time have to stay in the house with the front door open ...pain) sanded back well wood filled etc... 3 1/2 coats of acrylic primer then water based gloss with a brush and it looks crap brush marks all over .... Rushed to B&Q they said use a roller and an oil based gloss..... Going for the roller option tomorrow any tips cause I"m going to give up after that!!!!!
     
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  10. Pigeon85

    Pigeon85

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    To begin with b&q have given you bad or not very well detailed advice. If you are using water based then a good synthetic brush will be needed and if you do choose to put an oil based gloss on then ideally you need to put on a oil based undercoat first. If rolled on then you will need to lay it off with a brush after.
     
  11. catpuss1

    catpuss1

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    Well what I have done was lightly sand the water based gloss will that be ok? Before putting the oil based gloss on next. Any tips on use of roller, neighbour said roll slowly.........
     
  12. Pigeon85

    Pigeon85

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    You do really need to put an undercoat on before the gloss to provide a good bond between the two, if you are going for oil based then I would say to just use a brush. You will have a lot more time to work with it than the water based gloss you previously used. Check for runs in the paint as your going and brush them out.

    The reason I wouldn't suggest using a roller in your situation is no mater how slow you go you could still end up with specks of paint going everywhere.
     
  13. HERTS P&D

    HERTS P&D

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    Take the door off and put it on a couple of trestles, using a power sand with 80/120 grit and give it a Good sand down.

    Do this outside and wear a dust mask.

    Andy
     
  14. catpuss1

    catpuss1

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    Thanks all for your replies the saga continues after standing down the acrylic gloss I painted with dulux brilliant white weathersheild after being recommended that from B&Q , anyway played by the rules got up early waited 16 hrs to dry before closing the door, on opening the door today the bit that has been behind the frame has gone yellow!!!!! Within 48hrs
    I have spoke to dulux they are playing dumb spoke to B&Q they said it is known that they go yellow I"v wasted nearly a week doing this door now just waiting for dulux to get back to me attached photo any suggestions greatly apprciated
     
  15. abodeuk

    abodeuk

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    Yea I would strip it back down to its original state that way you can see if any rot has started to rot in and then correct it before building it up like Bosswhite said....its not just about getting the best finish, its about preserving it character too.
     
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