Wet pressure testing for too long?

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Hello

So I’ve plumbed a new bathroom in 15mm copper and Speedfit and wanted to test it out….

I’ve got a Rothenberger RP30 and done a wet test at 5bar for 24hrs. All seemed good.
Then I increased it to 10 bar pressure for the second 24hrs and the next morning found loads of small weeps, especially around the shower valve 3/4” connections. I tightened them all up as much as I dare and we still have weeping. Joints have been made using both PTFE and Jetlube.


Couple of Q’s -
A) There doesn’t seem to be any common recommendation of pressure and duration for the wet tests, and as I’m using two different types of pipe there will surely be differences anyway. In the real world what do other people usually test at and for how long please?

B) if I’ve overpressured it for too long, would anyone think the joints have been compromised and all need to be re-made?

Thanks!
Dave
 
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Hi,

I'm just a DIY'er, so I may be wrong! :)

But, I have found this recommendation from JG:

Screenshot_20211106-012501_Chrome.jpg


Link here:
https://probuildermag.co.uk/features/john-guest-testing-pipework-part-four

It's maybe possible that you slightly overdid it, just a little bit! ;)
 
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10 bar testing of a copper/push fit system isn't really needed. That is more so for a fully plastic system. It allows correct testing of the seals against the plastic pipe and also helps to bed the grab rings into the softer plastic. Also the high range pipe testing would normally only be performed on plastic pipe runs that are then capped off. You wouldn't normally have any connected outlets etc and test to 10bar, you would probably be reaching or over-reaching their maximum limits and any pipe to outlet seals.

Copper is slightly different whereby the grab ring is less liable to slip on the hard pipe once fitted. I would test at 1.5>2 times standing pressure on a mixed system.

What connections are using PTFE/Jointing compound? New connections don't need any kind of assistance.
 
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Thanks for all your info and help guys and the links are very useful. At least I know the sections which didn’t leak will be bullet proof! I’m going to re-do the joints that did leak, as in my mind I think that if water has found a route out that it would be a weakened spot. Most was around the concealed shower valve anyway so that’s not too bad. I’d connected the shower valve with 3/4”-15mm reducers (https://www.screwfix.com/p/flomasta-compression-adapting-male-coupler-15mm-x/82086) and then run a short stub of copper to brass compression equal elbows, then dropping down out the elbows to the Speedfit pipe. It’s the 3/4 to valve joints where I mostly put the PTFE and Jetlube.
 
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Just to update….. the main problem seems to be where the 3/4-to-15mm reducers meet the shower valve, these just screw in without olives or washers. I cleaned them all off and remade the connections - STILL leaking!!! Third time I repeated and put only Locktite 55 in the threads - PERFECT!
I was almost thinking of encasing the damn thing in expanding foam, but glad I got there in the end - fingers well crossed!
 
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If you are talking about the ones you linked to, then yup you need to use PTFE tape or cord to make the joint watertight. Looks like you got there though.. (y)
 
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